Kartoflane Kluski (Polish Potato Drop Dumplings)

This recipe for Polish potato drop dumplings (kartoflane kluski) uses raw, grated potatoes instead of mashed potatoes like Polish Kopytka does. These dumplings are something so very many of us in the Coal Region ate as a child — or make now in our own kitchens.

The Polish have a long history and love of potatoes — potatoes grew well in Polish soil and they became so plentiful, they were affordable for the peasants to purchase at the markets and then grow on their own.

Immigrants to the Anthracite Region brought their love of this vegetable with them. Today, these potato dumplings are a favorite of busy cooks because this super easy recipe has no rolling or cutting involved. The loose dough is dropped into boiling water by small spoonfuls and cooked until tender. 

Five simple ingredients make this Coal Region favorite budget-friendly, kid-friendly — and taste-bud friendly! Serve them with butter, fried onions, tossed with cottage cheese, sprinkled with crisp bacon bits…so many options!

Kartoflane Kluski (Polish Potato Drop Dumplings)

Recipe by A Coalcracker in the KitchenCourse: Sides, EntreeCuisine: Eastern European, Pa. DutchDifficulty: Easy

Ingredients

  • 1 large potato (peeled and finely grated)

  • 1 cup all purpose flour

  • 1 cup whole milk

  • 1/2 teaspoon salt (or to taste)

  • 1/8 teaspoon pepper (or to taste)

Directions

  • Bring a large saucepan of salted water to a boil.
  • In a medium bowl, mix together grated potato, flour, milk, salt, and pepper until a thick paste forms.
  • Dip a teaspoon in the boiling water, then dip a teaspoon in the dumpling mixture, pick up half a teaspoon or so of the dough with one spoon, and, using the second spoon, slide it into the gently boiling water. Continue until all the dumpling dough is gone. OR, spread the dough onto a plate and, using a wet spoon, scrape off pieces directly into the boiling water.
  • Simmer about 20 minutes or until dumplings are done to your taste.
  • Drain in a colander and serve as a side dish, a meal or add to soup.

DID YOU MAKE THIS RECIPE?

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I’m Lori Fogg

“A Coalcracker In The Kitchen”

Born and raised “a coal miner’s daughter” in the Anthracite Region of Pennsylvania, I love to share recipes and memories of home with fellow “coalcrackers” and celebrate our unique blending of Eastern European and Pa. Dutch heritage and cuisines here in northeast Pennsylvania.
Meet Lori
 

 
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