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Posts Tagged ‘meat’

postheadericon Fried Chicken Livers

When I was a kid growing up in Schuylkill County in the Anthracite Coal Region, one of the rituals my family participated in was a weekly (or almost weekly) visit to a farmers’ market/”auction” to pick up fresh produce, baked goods, flea market finds and other items the household needed for daily life (like vacuum parts for the ancient Hoover or to drop off the “touch lamp” for repair…)  There are two markets that have been staples for generations in the area I grew up in, Renninger’s Market in Schuylkill Haven, Pa. and Hometown Farmers’ Market , Hometown, Pa.  Because my Dad, who owned a tractor-trailer and hauled coal to NYC and Philly, was on the road during the week, our “day out” was a trip to Renninger’s on Sunday afternoon.

Pop would circle and circle the dirt portion of the parking lot, kicking up a cloud of dust behind the Buick, looking for a convenient (translates into “close to an entrance door”) parking space to make shopping easier. Standard operating procedure was to buy “X” amount of goods and then Mom or Dad took the haul back to the car to drop the items off so we did not have to carry all the purchases around the entire market, juggling donuts or tomatoes while jostling our way through the crowd.

Sunday always yielded a major haul of lovely produce in season, and if you played your cards right and shopped close to closing time, the farmers often marked the stuff waaaay down so they did not have to haul it back to the farm or dispose of it. Our purchases varied slightly from week to week, but there was one thing I got almost every Sunday we were at Renninger’s – fried chicken livers! A stand at the market sold, among other things, fried chicken livers — and I LOVED them (Pop loved gizzards and hearts). Crispy and golden brown, different in flavor than beef liver, I ate them dipped in a tangy, yet smooth horseradish sauce the stand provided. They were addicting.

After Mom and Pop passed away in the late 80s, I found myself going to the market less, but I always got some fried chicken livers any time I visited. When I moved away from the Coal Region for awhile, I longed for the fried livers and realized I could make them myself. They are a very budget friendly dish, cook quickly, and bring back very fond memories for me of Sunday afternoons spent with my beloved parents.

Most supermarkets and butchers sell fresh chicken livers relatively cheaply. If you can only get them frozen, make sure to thaw them completely in the refrigerator before cooking. To clean and prep the livers for cooking, remove the fatty-looking string that connects the small and large lobes of a complete liver and trim any visible pieces of white connective tissue.  You might also want to trim any green discoloration, which results from (harmless) contact with bile during processing.  You do not need to try to remove every thread crossing through the piece. The goal is to obtain a solid medallion. You will end up with oyster-shaped pieces from half an inch to two inches long.

Chicken livers are high in water content, so when frying in hot oil, they will “pop”; a long-handled spatula or spoon and spatter screen should always be used. The spattering will not last long and will completely subside when the livers are done. As at all times in the kitchen, take your time, pay attention and use common sense!

Fried Chicken Livers

Fried Chicken Livers

Ingredients

  • Canola oil or shortening for frying
  • 1 pound chicken livers, trimmed
  • 1 cup buttermilk OR evaporated milk (NOT sweetened condensed milk)
  • 1 cup all purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon seasoning salt
  • OR
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • Optional - pinch cayenne

Instructions

  1. Clean the livers, rinse in cold water, drain.
  2. Use a deep fryer OR pour oil into a large frying pan to a depth of 2 inches; heat over medium-high heat until a deep-fry thermometer registers 375F degrees.
  3. Soak livers in buttermilk/evaporated milk for 5 minutes.
  4. Combine flour, baking powder, pepper, seasoning salt (or garlic powder, and salt) or in a small dish.
  5. Drain livers; dredge each liver in flour mixture, shaking off excess flour; transfer to a plate.
  6. Fry livers in batches until golden brown, 3-4 minutes, covering pan with a splatter screen.
  7. Transfer cooked livers to a paper towel-lined plate.
  8. Serve with hot sauce, cream gravy or dipping sauce of your choice, if desired.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2019/05/08/fried-chicken-livers/

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postheadericon Pickled Beef Heart

While the heart is an organ, beef heart doesn’t actually qualify as organ meat. It’s a muscle, so it has a texture more similar to steak than liver. Not only is beef heart packed with lean protein and essential amino acids, it’s also rich in vitamins, enzymes, and minerals. Think of heart as a type of steak.  The use of beef heart has a long history among the Pa. Dutch and Amish, many of who raised and butchered their own meats.  It is also enjoyed by many in the Coal Region as it was easily obtained from farmers and at butcher shops plentiful throughout the area. When he was a young boy, my Dad left school at 8th grade in order to help support his four brothers, a sister, and Mom and Dad (who was a miner).  He did odd jobs and cleaned up at the local butcher shop and was often given things like liver, stomach, and heart to bring home which helped feed a miner’s family and their hungry, growing kids. They never complained, grew to like it and, in his later years, Pop would ask my Mom to make pickled heart for him.  “Nose-to-tail eating” was a frugality often necessary to survive and make ends meet and many cultures became creative with it!

Mom used to clean the heart first, cook it, then slice it or cut it into bite-sized pieces. Some cooks clean it after cooking. This recipe has optional pickling spice and is from a very old Pa. Dutch Cookbook, but many people, like my Mom, never used pickling spice. The option is yours.To prep the heart pre-cooking, cut away the fat, membranes, valves, tendons, and other connective tissue that doesn’t look very appetizing, so that you’re only left with nice and clean pieces of muscle. Then soak the heart in a salty cold water bath to help draw out the blood from the heart. Discard this soaking liquid. Beef heart is cooked when a knife or fork enter without difficulty.

Pickled Beef Heart

Pickled Beef Heart

Pickled Beef Heart

Ingredients

  • 1 beef heart (cleaned and cut into 3 or 4 pieces)
  • Beef stock or broth to cover meat (OR salted water)
  • One peeled and halved medium onion
  • PLUS one thinly sliced onion for layering in the jar with the heart and brine
  • Salt to taste - amount depends on how salted your broth/stock is
    Brine
  • 2 cups cider vinegar
  • 3/4 cup water
  • black pepper
  • salt to taste
  • OPTIONAL 1 Tablespoon pickling spice (cloves removed)

Instructions

  1. Clean then cook heart meat in the broth (using enough to cover and salt to taste) in covered pot approximately 1-1/2 to 2 hours or until done. Heart beef is cooked when a knife or fork enter without difficulty.
  2. Drain, cool to handle, and slice the meat.
  3. Place the sliced beef heart and onions in a large glass jar, alternating layers. Pepper the meat generously. Set aside.
  4. Combine vinegar, water, salt (and optional pickling spices) in a saucepan and bring to a boil, remove from heat, and pour over beef heart in jar.
  5. Refrigerate and wait a couple days before eating.

Notes

Some cooks add some peeled garlic cloves to the jar.

http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2019/04/18/pickled-beef-heart/

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postheadericon Pickled Beef Tongue

Beef tongue has been prepared and eaten in different regions of the world since ancient times. Beef tongue is found in many cuisines that make up the Coal Region including Eastern European, German and Pennsylvania Dutch, English, Italian, and Mexican to name a few.  In Russian cuisine the cooked beef tongue is sliced and served cold for “zakuska” (a starter) by itself or as a part of assorted cold meats platter. Tongue can be roasted, boiled, barbecued, smoked, or pickled. Although it might seem intimidating, cooking beef tongue is quite simple to do. It is tender and delicious and can be served on a sandwich, with mustard and/or horseradish sauce. Some pickled beef tongue recipes call for “pink salt” aka potassium nitrate in the brine which helps the meat retain its pink color (think corned beef or salamis), but this one does  not.  Some cooks prepare it by doing nothing more than cooking the tongue in salted water, cleaning it, slicing it, pouring pure vinegar over it in a jar and allowing it to marinate.

Pickled Beef Tongue

Pickled Beef Tongue

Pickled Beef Tongue

Ingredients

  • 1 - 3 to 4 pound beef tongue
  • 2 cups white vinegar
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 tsp salt or to taste
  • 1 Tablespoon pickling spice
  • 1 carrot
  • 1 rib celery
  • 1 small peeled onion

Instructions

  1. In large pot, cover tongue with cold water, add salt, carrot, onion, celery; cover and simmer until tender (a couple of hours).
  2. Drain and reserve 2 cups broth.
  3. Cool tongue until able to handle, then peel off thick covering.
  4. Combine reserved broth with the vinegar, sugar, and pickling spices. Add salt to taste.
  5. Place tongue in non-reactive bowl or jar. Cover with vinegar mixture.
  6. Cover, chill for 48 hours. Remove from vinegar mixture, slice across the grain and serve.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/12/17/pickled-beef-tongue/

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postheadericon Pickled Pig’s Feet

I have had several requests for “Pickled Pig’s Feet” which is actually different than the Souse recipe  on this site, even though some people refer to Souse as “pickled pig’s feet”. This is an old recipe and I make no guarantee to it’s success – it is not something in my regular repertoire. Pickled Pig’s Feet are available commercially prepared with Hormel being a recognized brand, but many Coal Region and Pa Dutch country folks have access to great markets and butchers who can supply fresh pigs’ feet and prefer to make their own. This recipe is from Oxmoor House Homestyle Recipes

Pickled Pig’s Feet

Pickled Pig’s Feet

Pickled Pigs' Feet

Ingredients

  • 4 pig's feet, cleaned and scraped
  • 1 small onion, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 cup chopped celery
  • 2 bay leaves (1 leaf used in 2 different places)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 cup cider vinegar
  • 12 whole cloves

Instructions

  1. Place pig's feet in a large container with cold water to cover. Soak 3 hours; scrub with a stiff brush. Rinse thoroughly.
  2. Combine pig's feet, onion, celery, 1 bay leaf, salt, and pepper in a large Dutch oven with cold water to cover. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer 3 hours or until meat is tender and separates from bones.
  3. Remove feet from cooking liquid with a slotted spoon. Place in a plastic, glass, or stainless steel container with a tight-fitting lid; set aside.
  4. Strain cooking liquid through a sieve; discard vegetables and bay leaf. Set cooking liquid aside to allow fat to rise to surface. Remove fat, and discard. Set cooking liquid aside.
  5. Combine vinegar, cloves, and remaining bay leaf in a saucepan. Bring to a boil; reduce heat, and simmer 1 minute. Add reserved cooking liquid, and bring to a boil.
  6. Pour vinegar mixture over pig's feet to completely cover. (Additional water may be added to cover pig's feet, if necessary. ) Set aside to cool to room temperature. Cover and refrigerate 24 hours.
  7. Remove pig's feet from vinegar mixture; serve cold.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/12/10/pickled-pigs-feet/

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postheadericon Pa Dutch Hog Maw

Hog Maw = Stuffed Pig’s Stomach. Now, before you run the other way, think about eating sausage stuffed in “natural” casing. You do realize “natural casing” are animal intestines, right? Okay, now for those of you still with me… It is said the Pa Dutch use everything except the “oink” from a hog. When your life calls for frugality, you learn to waste nothing – scrapple is a perfect example. Stuffed pig’s stomach is not confined to Pa Dutch cuisine however; it is found in Chinese, Soul Food, and Latin American cuisine to name just a few. Hog Maw is traditionally stuffed with cubed potatoes, sausage, onions and seasoning. Some cooks also add cabbage to their stuffing.  The mixture is “stuffed” into the cleaned stomach, the ends are sewn shut, and the Hog Maw is baked until it is browned and crispy then sliced for serving (for those who enjoy the taste and texture of the actual stomach) or the stuffing scooped out (for those who like the stuffing, but not the actual stomach). The choice is totally up to the person about to partake!  Hog Maw remains a traditional holiday dish among the Pa Dutch, especially being served on New Year’s Day along with the traditional pork and sauerkraut as a way of ensuring good luck for the coming year. Leftovers can also be served cold as a sandwich. Traditionally served in the winter, Hog Maw was made around the time of hog butchering days on the farms of Lancaster and Berks Counties and elsewhere in the Pennsylvania Dutch Country.  The original recipe was most likely brought to Pennsylvania from Germany where it is called “Saumagen” and served on a bed of sauerkraut., The stuffing is as individual as the person cooking the Hog Maw.  There is great debate as to whether adding cabbage is “correct” or not.  Since you are the one eating it, my philosophy is that you should be the one deciding what your Hog Maw stuffing should contain! This old recipe calls for both loose fresh sausage and cut-up smoked sausage. In the Coal Region and Pa Dutch areas of Pa., it is not hard to locate delicious fresh and smoked sausage made by local butchers and meat packers that put that commercially prepared “famous name” stuff to absolute shame.  Your stuffing is only as good as the ingredients, so find the best and use them! The stomach will stretch as stuffed.

NOTE: In Pennsylvania, the pig’s stomach can usually be purchased at one of the many traditional butchers at local farmers’ markets or local butcher shops. Some will clean/prep the stomach for you. If you do the prep yourself, wash the hog maw inside and out in cold water. Use a knife to scrape away excess fat or trim fat with kitchen shears. Rub and continuously rinse the hog maw until cleaned (some people use coarse salt to help with the rubbing and cleaning). There are Youtube videos to help you through this step.

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Pa Dutch Hog Maw

Pa Dutch Hog Maw

Pa Dutch Hog Maw

Ingredients

  • 1 large pig's stomach, well cleaned (all fat removed)
  • 1 pound fresh loose sausage or link sausage, casing removed and crumbled OR 1 pound sweet Italian if fresh is not available
  • 1 pound smoked sausage cut into 1/2-inch slices
  • about 2 - 2 & 1/2 pounds Russet potatoes, washed, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch cubes
  • 2 medium yellow onions, coarsely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped
  • OPTIONAL: 2 cups shredded cabbage
  • Salt and pepper to taste (amount varies depending on the seasoning already in your sausage)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350° F.
  2. Mix together the crumbled fresh and sliced smoked sausages, cubed potatoes, chopped onions (and shredded cabbage if using), parsley, and salt and pepper to taste.
  3. Sew the small opened end of the stomach with cooking twine to close.
  4. Stuff sausage mixture into stomach, pressing well with each addition.
  5. Once stuffed, sew closed the remaining open end with cooking twine.
  6. Place stuffed stomach in a shallow roasting pan. Pour a little water into the pan.
  7. Roast uncovered until potatoes (and cabbage if using) are tender and stomach is crispy, about 2 hours or so, basting about every 20 minutes with water or pan juices. If browning too quickly, cover with a tent of aluminum foil.
  8. Remove stomach from roasting pan. Slice stomach into 1 inch thick slices or scoop filling out.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/11/14/pa-dutch-hog-maw/

 

 

 

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postheadericon Lithuanian Kugelis (Bulviu Plokstainis)

Lithuanian Kugelis

If you asked 1,000 Lithuanian families for their Kugelis recipe, you more than likely would receive 1,000 different versions – varying sometimes by only one ingredient or amount of ingredient.  Kugelis is widely served in Lithuania in both restaurants and home kitchens. It translates to: “flat potato dish” or “potato pancake”. It is a comfort food and akin to how we, in the US, view Mac and cheese as a comfort food – we all have a family recipe and all like our own the best. Consisting of very finely grated potatoes, milk, onion, eggs, bacon and fat, Lithuanian Kugelis should not be confused with the Jewish Kugel which is a noodle dish. Because the technique for making this dish, although not rocket science, does need careful attention and the steps are important to follow — including the speed needed to grate and prep the potatoes and keeping them from graying — I have linked to a prize winning recipe that includes detailed directions for creating this delicious dish. It is more expedient than trying to explain the steps here and, since it is a prize winning recipe, I believe it is a good place to start if you are new to this dish.

Go to the Recipe: >> Prize-Winning Lithuanian Kugelis Recipe

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postheadericon Chicken Croquettes

As a Coal Cracker and Dutchie, I grew up appreciating an elegance that can be found in simple foods. And I recycle ingredients as much as possible and waste as little as possible.  Here, those philosophies come together in a classic diner and homey kitchen favorite – chicken croquettes. With the addition of some seasonings, refrigerator ingredients, and bread crumbs, leftover chicken becomes creamy, golden, crunchy pyramids  of goodness, nestled on top of a bed of mashed potatoes bathed in a smooth chicken gravy. If you do not have left-over chicken and do not have the time or inclination to cook it from scratch for this dish, a store-bought rotisserie chicken will yield plenty of meat with which to create these croquettes. I adore them with Pa Dutch Potato Filling and Pa Dutch Pepper Cabbage as the ultimate comfort meal.

Chicken Croquettes

Homey Chicken Croquettes

Ingredients

  • Chicken Croquettes
  • 2 cups diced cooked chicken
  • 1/3 cup finely chopped celery (including some leaves if you have them)
  • ¼ tsp celery salt
  • 1 tsp fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tsp chopped fresh parsley
  • ¾ cup thick white sauce (see below for white sauce recipe)
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 ¼ cups fresh bread crumbs
  • 1 ¼ cups fresh cracker crumbs OR use all fine dry breadcrumbs
  • 2 large eggs, beaten
  • Vegetable oil for frying
  • 2 to 3 cups chicken gravy (see below for gravy recipe) OR canned/jarred gravy of your choice
  • Fresh parsley sprigs for garnish

Instructions

  1. For the Croquettes:
  2. Make the thick white sauce, set aside to cool.
  3. Combine the chicken, celery, celery leaves, celery salt, lemon juice, parsley, white sauce and salt thoroughly in a large mixing bowl. Refrigerate until easy to form croquettes, about 30 minutes. Use about ½ cup each of the mixture to form into cones or rectangular croquettes.
  4. Mix the fresh bread and cracker crumbs together, then roll the croquettes in the crumbs, dip them in the beaten eggs, and then roll them in the crumbs again. Chill for at least 30 minutes until firm.
  5. Deep fry in 3” of vegetable oil in a large, heavy skillet or fryer at 375° until golden brown, about 5 minutes. Keep on a plate in a preheated 300° oven until ready to serve. Serve with gravy on the side and garnish with fresh parsley.
  6. For the Thick White Sauce:
  7. 3 tbsp butter or vegetable shortening
  8. 3 tbsp all-purpose flour
  9. 1 cup milk
  10. ¼ tsp salt
  11. Dash of freshly ground black or white pepper
  12. In a 1 quart saucepan, melt the butter over medium heat. Gradually add the flour, stirring with a whisk until it becomes a smooth paste, approximately 2 minutes. Gradually add the milk, stirring constantly until thickened. Add salt and pepper and reduce heat to very low. Stir for at least one minute before adding to the prepared dish. Yield: 1 cup
  13. Recipe for Chicken Gravy
  14. 2-1/2 cups chicken stock or broth
  15. 6 T butter
  16. 6 T all-purpose flour
  17. 1/4 cup chopped celery
  18. 1/4 cup chopped onion
  19. Salt and pepper to taste
  20. Melt the butter in a heavy saucepan, whisk in the flour and stir over medium heat until golden and bubbling. Slowly whisk in the stock, celery and onions, stirring constantly until smooth, creamy and thickened, about 10 minutes. Serve immediately.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/10/10/chicken-croquettes/

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postheadericon Halupki Casserole

I adore halupki, (AKA golumpki, blind pigeons, stuffed cabbage, etc.) but I do not always have time to core, cook, and prep whole cabbage leaves or dedicate the cooking time to the traditional roll version. I also often find myself with a partial head of cabbage in the veggie bin left over from making another dish…no whole leaves to harvest from the head, but still lots of usefulness left. In those instances, I put together this faster to prep and cook casserole version of Halupki that provides all the flavor with far less fuss. As with the rolls, I like this served with mashed potatoes as a side. This recipe gets its sweet and sour element in the sauce from tomato soup and a little sugar and vinegar. You can add a few strips of bacon to the top when baking, or even a layer of sauerkraut; dress it up with what you like and what you have on hand if desired. This freezes beautifully; just thaw and reheat when you get a craving! I like to mimic the inside of traditional halupki by making little meatballs to layer in the casserole, but you can cut the prep time even more by just sprinkling little “globs” of the meat mixture into the dish. I have also made this in the slow-cooker. Prep the recipe as written, but layer into the crock, cook on low 4 – 6 hours or until cabbage is tender. I normally oven bake this in a disposable aluminum lasagna pan; it gives me some extra depth to avoid spill overs and makes for super easy cleanup.

Halupki Casserole

Halupki Casserole

Ingredients

  • Approx 1-1/2 - 2 lb cabbage, core removed and chopped in 1/2 inch pieces or medium shreds (approx. 1/4" )
  • Meat Mixture
  • 3/4 pound ground beef
  • 1/2 pound ground pork (OR use all ground beef)
  • 1/2 cup uncooked long grain white rice
  • 1 small onion, diced fine
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 egg
  • 1 T Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper
  • Sauce
  • 2 - 10 ounce cans condensed tomato soup
  • 1 - 15 ounce can diced tomatoes, undrained
  • 2 - 8 ounce cans tomato sauce
  • 1 T sugar
  • 1 T white vinegar or lemon juice
  • 1/8 tsp black pepper
  • OPTIONAL: 1 - 2 cups sauerkraut and/or bacon strips (to layer on top of cabbage.)

Instructions

  1. In a bowl, mix the sauce ingredients together, set aside.
  2. In another bowl, mix the meat mixture ingredients together well. Form into bite-sized meatballs.
  3. In a deep casserole dish or lasagna pan, place a few spoonfuls of sauce, then layer half the meatballs, then half the cabbage on top and pour half the remaining sauce over the top. Repeat with remaining meatballs, then cabbage, then last of the sauce. NOTE: If you are using sauerkraut and/or bacon, place these on the layers of cabbage before adding the sauce each time.
  4. Cover tightly with foil and bake at 350 F degrees until cabbage is tender. Baking time varies with how large or small you chopped the cabbage. Start testing the cabbage with a fork after 1 hour. Recover tightly and continue to cook until tender.
  5. NOTE #1: Natural water content of cabbage will vary with each head. You may find your cabbage has released a lot of water or not much. If your casserole seems to need more sauce or is drying, add a little water as it bakes. I always "sloosh" the tomato soup cans with some water to rinse them well and use this if I need to adjust the liquid during baking.
  6. NOTE #2: If adding bacon to your layers, keep in mind bacon will release grease as it cooks, Adding a lot of bacon can cause an excess of grease in the finished dish especially if you start with a high fat ground beef.
  7. NOTE #3: This is not a precise recipe. You might have more or less cabbage, use more or less meat, need more or less sauce...It is one of those recipes where your eyes and instincts will guide you as you put it together.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/10/06/halupki-casserole/

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postheadericon Pa Dutch Yum-A-Setta

As a Dutchie and Coal Cracker, I never met a noodle or dough ball I didn’t like.  Add cheese to the noodles or dough, and I am in 7th heaven. This casserole does that and, needless to say, is one of my favorites.  Layers of noodles, cheese, and lightly sweetened tomato/burger mix come together in a dish sure to become a family favorite. A pot-luck friendly, travels well recipe, it is also budget friendly, kid-friendly, and can be prepared ahead of baking time. I prefer Velveeta wrapped slices for their melting quality in this recipe, but you can substitute another brand or use deli sliced “American cheese”.  I also use medium width noodles in this dish so the sauce and cheese mixes through well. I pair this with Pa Dutch Pepper Cabbage and it becomes the ultimate comfort food meal for me! COOK’S NOTE: When draining noodles after cooking, I do not drain them perfectly dry.  I leave them slightly damp so that the undiluted cream of chicken soup mixes nicely with them.  SLIGHTLY damp — not dripping!

Pa Dutch Yum-a-Setta

 

Pa Dutch Yum-A-Setta

Ingredients

  • 1 - 1/2 lb. hamburger
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 2 T. brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup onion, finely chopped
  • 1 can condensed tomato soup, undiluted (10-3/4 ounce can)
  • 1 can cream of chicken soup, undiluted (10-1/2 ounce can)
  • 12 ounces egg noodles
  • 12 slices individually wrapped processed (Velveeta or equivalent deli sliced)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350F.
  2. Brown hamburger and onion with salt, pepper. Drain off excess grease.
  3. Add brown sugar, and undiluted tomato soup to the meat mixture and stir well.
  4. Meanwhile, cook the egg noodles according to package directions; drain. Add undiluted cream of chicken soup to the noodles and mix.
  5. Butter a 13" x 9" casserole dish. Layer 1/2 of the noodle mixture in the bottom of the pan, top with 6 slices cheese layered across the top, then top that with 1/2 of the hamburger mixture. Repeat the layering with the remaining noodle mixture, 6 cheese slices, and hamburger mixture.
  6. Bake at 350 for 30 - 35 minutes.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/10/02/pa-dutch-yum-a-setta/

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postheadericon Pa. Dutch Ham Barbecue

“Barbecue” to the Penn Dutch and in the Coal Region is not typically something smoked over wood or a smoking/cooking technique.  In this instance, it refers to chopped meat simmered in a sauce then served on a burger bun. (see Coal Region Barbecue for more on this phenomenon…).  This recipe was created to use deli ham making it fast and easy to make. When making this barbecue, I often use Sahlen’s Deli Ham.  I suggest a good quality deli ham, not something cheap and loaded with added water.  If the deli ham is reminiscent of a slice of baked smoked  ham, you have found it! (Almost every deli will allow you to sample anything they carry — go ahead and experiment with your choices.) Get the ham sliced extremely thin.  We know it as “chipped” here in the coal region and in many areas of Pa., but some regions refer to it as “shaved”.  This is great for parties, get-togethers, and pot lucks.  It holds nicely in a slow-cooker and reheats well. I prefer to make it the day before serving to help the flavors really come together.

Ham Barbecue

Pa. Dutch Ham Barbecue

Ingredients

  • 1 - 1/4 to 1-1/2 pounds good quality deli ham, shaved/chipped
  • 4 tablespoons white sugar
  • 6 tablespoons vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon yellow mustard
  • 1/2 cup ketchup
  • 1/2 cup grated onion
  • 1/2 cup finely diced green pepper

Instructions

  1. In a medium sauce pan, mix all ingredients, except ham, until well blended. Lightly chop ham into bit-sized pieces and add ham, mix well. Simmer 15 - 20 minutes. Serve on buns/rolls of choice.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/10/01/pa-dutch-ham-barbecue/

 

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