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Posts Tagged ‘Freezer-friendly’

postheadericon Basic PA Dutch Bread Filling

Here in the PA Dutch and Coal Region area, we (especially us Dutchies) refer to “stuffing” as “filling”. There is no real debate about whether it’s “stuffing” if it is made/baked one way versus “filling” another way in MY house.  Nope. It’s “FILLING”. Has been to me for as long as I remember and always will be.  Mom made her filling in a big huge bowl for holiday dinners during which several dozen family members descended on our house and laughter filled the air (along with cigarette smoke because…well…seems more people smoked than not “back then”.) Sometimes some filling went into the bird, but there was ALWAYS a dish full baked in a buttered casserole. I loved that version because I just love the “crust” the filling makes along the bottom of the dish. My Aunt adored an evening snack after a holiday dinner consisting of turkey on white bread, a slab of mom’s bread filling, mayo, and cranberry sauce. Mom did not use any potatoes at all in her bread filling nor much poultry seasoning but you should adjust it to your own taste (more or less celery/onion, butter…).  Mom used milk in hers, you can use stock if you like.  Me, I keep it “Mom’s” and make it like she did! This is a moist mixture before baking, not one that keeps the bread cubes in big pieces and barely moistens them. I like to cut a slice of this once it is cold and fry it in a little butter, browning the “patty”  on both sides.

Pa Dutch Bread Filling

Basic PA Dutch Bread Filling

Ingredients

  • 8 cups cubed white bread (stale or left out to dry overnight)
  • 4 eggs, beaten well
  • 3 large ribs of celery, chopped (with some chopped leaves if possible)
  • 1 - 2 large onion, chopped (about the same amount as the chopped celery)
  • 1 stick butter
  • 2 Tbsp fresh parsley, chopped (or 2 tsp dried)
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Sage and/or savory and/or poultry seasoning and/or Bell's Stuffing seasoning to your taste
  • Milk or chicken stock as needed (mixture should be wet, but not "soupy"

Instructions

  1. Break up or cut bread into cubes. I use stale bread, leave the cubes out uncovered over night spread out on a tray or baking sheet, or you can even dry them on low in the oven. Place dried or stale cubes into large bowl.
  2. In frying pan, melt butter, add chopped celery and onions and saute on low until soft. I like to actually brown the veggies some, I think it adds to the flavor and color of the filling. Set aside to cool.
  3. Beat eggs, add to bowl with bread cubes. Pour cooled butter and cooked celery and onions over the cubes. Toss lightly to start to mix.
  4. Add the milk or stock and gently toss and mix. It should be moist but not soupy. I find I use around a cup depending on the bread, butter amount, etc. Start with less - you can always add, but you cannot take it out.
  5. Season as desired. I usually add about 1 - 2 teaspoons poultry seasoning or Bell's seasoning. Sometimes, I do not use anything other than salt and pepper - it depends on who will be eating it!
  6. Turn out into a well buttered casserole baking dish.
  7. Bake at 350F until set and browned - 45 minutes or so. You can stir the filling part way through if you desire, but I do not because I like the "crust" to form along the dish sides and bottom.
  8. Serve.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/10/19/basic-pa-dutch-bread-filling/

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postheadericon Halupki Casserole

I adore halupki, (AKA golumpki, blind pigeons, stuffed cabbage, etc.) but I do not always have time to core, cook, and prep whole cabbage leaves or dedicate the cooking time to the traditional roll version. I also often find myself with a partial head of cabbage in the veggie bin left over from making another dish…no whole leaves to harvest from the head, but still lots of usefulness left. In those instances, I put together this faster to prep and cook casserole version of Halupki that provides all the flavor with far less fuss. As with the rolls, I like this served with mashed potatoes as a side. This recipe gets its sweet and sour element in the sauce from tomato soup and a little sugar and vinegar. You can add a few strips of bacon to the top when baking, or even a layer of sauerkraut; dress it up with what you like and what you have on hand if desired. This freezes beautifully; just thaw and reheat when you get a craving! I like to mimic the inside of traditional halupki by making little meatballs to layer in the casserole, but you can cut the prep time even more by just sprinkling little “globs” of the meat mixture into the dish. I have also made this in the slow-cooker. Prep the recipe as written, but layer into the crock, cook on low 4 – 6 hours or until cabbage is tender. I normally oven bake this in a disposable aluminum lasagna pan; it gives me some extra depth to avoid spill overs and makes for super easy cleanup.

Halupki Casserole

Halupki Casserole

Ingredients

  • Approx 1-1/2 - 2 lb cabbage, core removed and chopped in 1/2 inch pieces or medium shreds (approx. 1/4" )
  • Meat Mixture
  • 3/4 pound ground beef
  • 1/2 pound ground pork (OR use all ground beef)
  • 1/2 cup uncooked long grain white rice
  • 1 small onion, diced fine
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 egg
  • 1 T Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper
  • Sauce
  • 2 - 10 ounce cans condensed tomato soup
  • 1 - 15 ounce can diced tomatoes, undrained
  • 2 - 8 ounce cans tomato sauce
  • 1 T sugar
  • 1 T white vinegar or lemon juice
  • 1/8 tsp black pepper
  • OPTIONAL: 1 - 2 cups sauerkraut and/or bacon strips (to layer on top of cabbage.)

Instructions

  1. In a bowl, mix the sauce ingredients together, set aside.
  2. In another bowl, mix the meat mixture ingredients together well. Form into bite-sized meatballs.
  3. In a deep casserole dish or lasagna pan, place a few spoonfuls of sauce, then layer half the meatballs, then half the cabbage on top and pour half the remaining sauce over the top. Repeat with remaining meatballs, then cabbage, then last of the sauce. NOTE: If you are using sauerkraut and/or bacon, place these on the layers of cabbage before adding the sauce each time.
  4. Cover tightly with foil and bake at 350 F degrees until cabbage is tender. Baking time varies with how large or small you chopped the cabbage. Start testing the cabbage with a fork after 1 hour. Recover tightly and continue to cook until tender.
  5. NOTE #1: Natural water content of cabbage will vary with each head. You may find your cabbage has released a lot of water or not much. If your casserole seems to need more sauce or is drying, add a little water as it bakes. I always "sloosh" the tomato soup cans with some water to rinse them well and use this if I need to adjust the liquid during baking.
  6. NOTE #2: If adding bacon to your layers, keep in mind bacon will release grease as it cooks, Adding a lot of bacon can cause an excess of grease in the finished dish especially if you start with a high fat ground beef.
  7. NOTE #3: This is not a precise recipe. You might have more or less cabbage, use more or less meat, need more or less sauce...It is one of those recipes where your eyes and instincts will guide you as you put it together.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/10/06/halupki-casserole/

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