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Posts Tagged ‘Bacon’

postheadericon Zweibelkuchen ( Pa. Dutch Onion Pie)

Zweibelkuchen translates to “onion cake”/”tart” in German, but it’s also known in Pa. Dutch kitchens as “Onion Pie”.  Zwiebelkuchen is related to the Black Forest region of Germany. It is tradition that it is prepared at the beginning of fall, after the bountiful summer crop of onions come in and is usually served as a lunch dish.  This traditional German dish ranges in size and shape depending on the cook (and, in Germany, the area in which it is served); some are flat and cut into squares with a thinner layer of the topping (like this version), others are thicker and deeper and often made in a spring-form pan. No matter the size, shape, or depth,  the rich and buttery caramelized onions and savory bacon filling is consistent.  The German immigrants who became known as “Pennsylvania Dutch (“Deutsch” in German) enjoyed this dish in the motherland and re-created it in their new homes in America.  Zweibelkuchen is at its best when served lukewarm. Use good quality bacon if you can get it to make zweibelkuchen.

Zwiebelkuchen (Pa. Dutch Onion Pie)

Zwiebelkuchen (Pa. Dutch Onion Pie)

Zweibelkuchen (Pa Dutch /German Onion Pie)

Ingredients

    DOUGH:
  • 1 cup milk, lukewarm (110F degrees)
  • 1 package instant dry yeast (2 and 1/4 tsp)
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour, (375g)
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 6 Tbsp vegetable oil
    ONION TOPPING:
  • 2 1/4 lbs yellow onions, finely diced
  • 5 slices good quality thick cut bacon, finely diced
  • 3/4 cup full fat sour cream
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp caraway seeds

Instructions

  1. Pour the lukewarm milk into the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook attachment.
  2. Dissolve the yeast in the milk. Cover with plastic wrap and allow to stand 5 to 10 minutes until foamy.
  3. Turn mixer on low and add the flour, sugar, vegetable oil, and salt and knead until a soft dough forms (about 5 minutes).
  4. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured surface and knead with your hands for one more minute adding as little flour as necessary to keep it from being too sticky to work.
  5. Place the dough in a lightly greased bowl, cover and let the dough rest in a warm place 45 minutes or until approximately doubled in size.
  6. Meanwhile, in a frying pan, fry the diced bacon until crispy.
  7. Add the diced onions to it, reduce heat to medium-low and allow the the onions to slowly cook to golden brown and carmelized, about 15 to 20 minutes. Remove from heat and allow the mixture to cool slightly.
  8. In a mixing bowl, combine sour cream, eggs, salt and caraway seeds. Add the cooled onion mixture to it and combine well.
  9. Grease a 18 x 13-inch (known as a "half-sheet") baking sheet or line it with parchment paper.
  10. Flour hands lightly and spread the dough evenly pinching up a slight rim at the edges of the dough to hold the topping.
  11. Spread the onion mixture on top of it and sprinkle lightly with some additional caraway seeds is desired.
  12. Preheat the oven to 390F (200C) and allow the pie to rise a second time while the oven is heating.
  13. Bake on middle rack of oven 25-30 minutes until top is light brown.
  14. Let cool for a few minutes before serving. Best served lukewarm.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2019/05/12/zweibelkuchen/

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postheadericon Lithuanian Bacon Buns

The Southern Coal region of Pennsylvania is known as “Little Lithuania”.  Anthracite and the industry surrounding it lured many Lithuanians in during the 1860s-1910s era.  Shenandoah (Pa), earned itself the nickname, “the Vilnius of North America” and was a much larger town then than it is today, with a population of upwards of 40 000, a quarter of them Lithuanians.  Lithuanian migration to the Coal Region was often a result of Lithuanians back home being discriminated against under the Russian Imperial rule with their language banned between years 1865 and 1904.  The locations with the most Lithuanian heritage in Schuylkill County are Shenandoah itself, Shenandoah Heights, Frackville, Mahanoy City, Mount Carmel, and Tamaqua.  Almost every town here has (or had) a Lithuanian church, cemetery, and club(s).  Is it any wonder that Lithuanian foods are such a part of our Coal Region heritage and holiday celebrations?  A Christmas time treat in many homes in the Coal Region is lasineciai – Lithuanian Bacon Buns. These special bites of heaven are passed  around during Christmas in Lithuanian homes. accompanied with the salutation, “Linksmu Kaledu,” which means Merry Christmas!

NOTES:

  • Semi-frozen bacon is much easier to cut into pieces.
  • Use a nice, meaty bacon like you find at a good farmers’ market or butcher shop.
  • You can make these with frozen, thawed bread dough from the grocery store, but they will not be the same taste and texture as the scratch made dough – which is rich and a little sweet like a brioche dough – but it does cut down dramatically on prep-time.
  • As you make successive batches and get more proficient, you may find you prefer to pinch off individual balls of dough and flatten, fill, and shape them using that method rather than a cutter.

Lithuanian Bacon Buns

Lithuanian Bacon Buns

Lithuanian Bacon Buns

Ingredients

    Filling
  • 3/4 pound good bacon, cut into 1/4 inch pieces
  • 1 medium onion, finely chopped
    Dough
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 1/4 pound unsalted butter
  • 1/4 cup white sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 package active dry yeast or 2 1/4 teaspoons from a jar of yeast
  • 3 large room temperature eggs, beaten
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
    Egg Wash
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 2 teaspoons water

Instructions

    Filling
  1. Put bacon and onion in frying pan, add water to barely cover. With lid on, simmer until water evaporates watching closely.
  2. Place filling in refrigerator to cool completely.
    Dough
  1. Scald milk. Whisk in butter, sugar, and salt. Cool to lukewarm (110 - 115 F degrees).
  2. Whisk in the yeast.
  3. Place this mixture in the bowl of a stand mixer or other large bowl.
  4. Add the beaten eggs and flour and beat vigorously with wooden spoon or mixer's paddle attachment until smooth.
  5. Lightly grease top of dough, cover bowl with towel and let rise until doubled in warm spot.
  6. Punch down dough and let rise until doubled one more time.
  7. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface. Cut in half and work with one half of dough at a time, keeping other half covered.
  8. Roll dough about 1/4 to 3/8 inch thick. Cut out 3 inch circles of dough with a round cutter.
  9. Place a tablespoon or so of cooled bacon mixture in center of circle.
  10. Fold over and pinch edges of dough together to completely cover the filling.
  11. Shape into a ball or torpedo shape and place seam side down on parchment lined baking sheet leaving space between buns to rise and expand. Repeat with other half of dough; re-roll scraps.
  12. Cover rolls lightly with greased plastic wrap and let rise until almost doubled.
  13. Pre-heat oven to 375 F. Brush rolls with egg wash.
  14. Bake 20 to 25 minutes until golden brown. Brush with butter when removed from oven if desired.
  15. Can be served hot, at room temperature or reheated in the oven.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/11/29/lithuanian-bacon-buns/

 

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postheadericon Kapusta – Polish Cabbage, Potato, and Bacon Bake

Kapusta in Polish means “cabbage”.  Our eastern European roots and Pa Dutch influence in Schuylkill County (Pa.) mean we love our cabbage dishes!  There are kapusta soups, casseroles made with sauerkraut, and casseroles, like this favorite recipe, made with fresh cabbage and — (almost) everybody’s favorite — bacon! This recipe could be made meatless by using butter to fry the cabbage rather than bacon fat.  Potatoes, bacon, cabbage, topped with a layer of cheese and baked until bubbly – what’s not to love?

Kapusta Casserole

Polish Cabbage, Potato, and Bacon Bake

Ingredients

  • 1 pound diced bacon
  • 1 large diced onion
  • 1 (2 1/2-pound) cabbage, cored and coarsely chopped
  • 3 large russet potatoes, peeled, cut into 1/2-inch cubes and parboiled
  • 1 teaspoon salt (or to taste)
  • 1/2 to 1 teaspoon pepper (or to taste)
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 1/2 cup shredded Swiss cheese, Edam, or Gouda

Instructions

  1. Heat oven to 375 degrees.
  2. In a very large ovenproof skillet or Dutch oven, saute diced bacon until crisp but not burned. Using a slotted spoon, remove bacon, and set aside.
  3. If desired, some of the bacon fat can be removed but, traditionally, it is left in. Add the onion and cabbage to the bacon fat, mixing well. Cook until the cabbage has completely collapsed and is al dente, about 20 minutes. Add the well-drained potatoes, salt, pepper, cream, and reserved bacon, and mix completely. Remove from heat.
  4. Place in casserole dish. Sprinkle the cheese over the casserole top and cover tightly with foil or an ovenproof lid.
  5. Bake 35 minutes or until potatoes are almost done. Remove cover and bake an additional 10 minutes or until cheese is melted and golden, and potatoes are tender.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/10/23/kapusta/

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