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Archive for the ‘Meatless’ Category

postheadericon Sauerkraut Salad

As we start in to cook-out season here in the Coal Region, the requisite potato and macaroni salads show up. As much as I am  fan of both of those, I like to “shake things up a bit” and add something to the mix that is a bit unexpected. My favorite for warm weather gatherings is Sauerkraut Salad. Embracing the Anthracite Coal Region blending of cultures — the Pa. Dutch, German, and Eastern European cuisines love to make dishes from sauerkraut and cabbage — this fits in perfectly!

Even people who normally do not like sauerkraut (GASP!!!) often like this salad. It’s delicious as a side dish, but also good on burgers, sausages, brats, and sandwiches. Make sure to make it a day ahead so the flavors can blend. I make it the night before serving. As with so many recipes, this lends itself well to adapting to your tastes;  adjust the sugar and vinegar as you prefer. If in doubt about amounts, always start with less — you can always add, but you cannot take it out once mixed in!

Sauerkraut Salad

Sauerkraut Salad

Pa. Dutch Sauerkraut Salad

Ingredients

  • 1 quart of sauerkraut
  • 1 cup green bell pepper, diced
  • 1 small onion, diced
  • 1 cup celery, diced
  • 1/2 cup carrot, diced
  • 1 small jar pimentos, drained
  • OPTIONAL 1 apple, chopped (Use something sweet/tart and crisp; Braeburn, Jonagold, Pink Lady, Fuji, Gala))
  • 1 cup white sugar (or to your taste)
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 cup vinegar (cider or white)
  • black pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Rinse and drain sauerkraut.
  2. In large bowl, mix sugar, oil, vinegar and stir until sugar is dissolved.
  3. Add chopped vegetables, sauerkraut and pimentos. Add black pepper to taste. Stir to mix well.
  4. Marinate overnight in the refrigerator before serving.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2019/05/19/sauerkraut-salad/

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postheadericon Fried Cornmeal Mush

Pa Dutch Fried Cornmeal Mush

Pa Dutch Fried Cornmeal Mush

Fried Cornmeal Mush

Ingredients

  • 1 Cup Yellow Corn Meal
  • 1 Cup COLD Water
  • 3 Cups Water
  • 1 tsp. Salt

Instructions

  1. In a heavy saucepan, bring 3 Cups of water and the salt to a boil.
  2. In a small bowl, mix together the cornmeal and the 1 cup of COLD water.
  3. Gradually stir the cornmeal and water mixture into the salted boiling water.
  4. Cook for 5 minutes, stirring constantly.
  5. Cover, and continue cooking for 10 - 15 minutes, stirring occasionally (should be very thick).
  6. Pour into a loaf pan, cool and refrigerate until completely cold and firm.
  7. Slice into thin slices.
  8. Dredge in seasoned flour and fry in fat until golden brown and crispy.
  9. Serve hot.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2019/05/03/fried-cornmeal-mush/

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postheadericon Retro Carrot-Pineapple Salad

Dad was a “meat and potatoes” kinda guy.  Mom and I, however, had no problem with veggies. Of course, the older I got, the more open I was to them…maybe not so adventurous in my childhood (I remember Mom being “creative” in order to get me to eat more than green peas in my early years.)

Like many folks in the Coal Region, “eating out” was reserved for special occasions, like birthdays and anniversaries. We did not have the budget to indulge in restaurant meals often, but when we did, it was all the more special.  We had our favorite spots for these occasions, but there was a family buffet style restaurant where Mom and I would look anytime we went there for one particular item — on the salad bar. Mom and I would peruse the offerings before taking a plate and would get all excited if we truly got lucky and the CARROT SALAD was there — crispy shredded carrots, plump juicy raisins, sweet and tangy pineapple, chopped walnuts — and mini marshmallows – oh, how we loved that salad! Surrounded by baked ham, golden turkey, fried shrimp, a plethora of Pa Dutch “sweets ‘n sours”, and so much more Mom and I felt like we’d struck gold if the carrot salad was on the menu that night. As Pop sat there (with a plate full of fried shrimp that needed side-boards to keep it in check) looking at us like we had lost our senses, Mom and I “umm-d” and “ahh-d” our way through that carrot salad.

Funny thing is, as easy as it is to make at home, we rarely did while she was alive. I suppose the “magic” of that restaurant’s carrot salad was not in the salad itself (although there were those mini marshmallows…) but rather was in the pure enjoyment of spending an evening together, doing something that was very special to us and was a somewhat rare event, not a hum-drum, every day occurrence like eating out these days has become for so many people.

I started making the carrot salad again awhile ago and really enjoy it for Easter dinner as well as throughout the year. Unfortunately, the last time I made it, I did not have the marshmallows in the pantry, thus the salad was “mini-less”. But as I took a bite and thought of Mom, Dad, and the many special occasions we shared throughout the years I was blessed to have them in my life, I was transported in my memories right back to that restaurant with two very special people right beside me.

This recipe is easily adjusted to your taste; both the nuts and mini marshmallows are optional – but highly recommended!

Retro Carrot Pineapple Salad

Retro Carrot Pineapple Salad

Retro Carrot Pineapple Salad

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • 1 (8-ounce) can of crushed pineapple, drained well - juice reserved
  • Left-over pineapple juice (from draining) and enough water to make 1 cup to plump raisins
  • 1 pound carrots, peeled and grated
  • 3/4 cup mayonnaise
  • 1 and 1/2 Tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 cup mini marshmallows
  • 1/3 cup roughly chopped pecans or walnuts (or to your taste)

Instructions

  1. Drain pineapple of excess juices, reserving juice into measuring cup. Add enough water to make 1 cup.
  2. Heat pineapple juice/water to very hot. Remove from heat. Add raisins and allow to plump and cool. (about 30 minutes) Then drain well and discard liquid.
  3. Place peeled, grated carrots in mixing bowl.
  4. In another smaller bowl, mix mayonnaise, sugar, and lemon juice.
  5. Pour dressing over carrots and mix well.
  6. Fold in raisins, pineapple, marshmallows, and nuts until combined.
  7. Cover and refrigerate to chill thoroughly. Stir before serving
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2019/04/10/retro-carrot-pineapple-salad/

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postheadericon Pa Dutch Pretzel Soup (Shdreis’l Suppee)

This is a real Pa. Dutch comfort food that goes way back, is cheap and easy to make, warms you up and is often eaten before bed time.  I certainly have had too many bowls in my lifetime to keep count. Calling it a”soup” is actually over-kill. It is simply warmed milk with a lump of butter added to each bowl in which “Reading butter pretzels” are crushed and soak in the milk.

(Reading Pa, in Berks County, with a sizable population of Pa. Dutch folks, was home to numerous pretzel shops, earning it the nickname Pretzel City.  At one time, Reading produced one-third of all the pretzels baked in the U.S. While Berks County’s pretzel industry may not be as prominent as it once was, its legacy lives on.)

This “recipe” is from an old Pa Dutch cookbook and, naturally, specified “Reading” pretzels. Today, a good choice is a butter pretzel like Bachman Pretzels Butter Twists, Snyder’s Butter Snaps, etc. I have also used a hearty hard pretzel obtained from Amish farmers’ markets or bulk food stores in this soup.  Some people like their pretzels to retain some crunch, others prefer the pretzels soften before indulging.  There are some variations of this soup that start with a roux resulting in a thicker “milk broth”, but I like mine this way – plain and simple with just milk and butter.

Pa Dutch Pretzel Soup

Pa Dutch Pretzel Soup

Ingredients

  • Milk
  • Butter
  • Salt and Pepper to taste
  • Pretzels (butter pretzels are best, but plain hard pretzels will also work), broken into pieces

Instructions

  1. Heat a bowl of milk for each person to be served.
  2. To each bowl of milk add a small piece of butter.
  3. At the table each person should add enough pretzels to fill their bowl.
  4. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2019/04/10/pa-dutch-pretzel-soup-shdreisl-suppee/

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postheadericon Potato Pampushki – Cheese Stuffed Potato Cakes

Pampushki are starchy bites usually served with soup, such as borscht.  Much of the time, pampushki are yeast rolls, usually drizzled with butter and garlic. Pampushki (singular – pampushka) is common in Russia, Ukraine, and other parts in Eastern Europe. These pampushki are made with potatoes, stuffed with cheese, and pan fried until cooked and crispy…need I say more?! Think of them as stuffed potato pancakes.

What sets these pampushki apart from generic potato pancakes is that they are made with both mashed potatoes and shredded raw potatoes.  Creamy, crunchy, and fried to golden, brown, and delicious, they contain a luscious cheesy filling made from farmer’s cheese, Parmesan and chives. You can use shredded mozzerella cheese or the cheese of your choice and add to or change up the filling to suit your taste; caramelized onions, bacon,or chopped mushrooms, etc. Potato pampushki can be served as a main course, side dish, appetizer, or snack. Make them half the size as directed to use as appetizers.

Potato Pampushki

Potato Pampushki

Potato Pampushki

Ingredients

  • 2 and 1/2 cups mashed potatoes (Yukon Gold preferred because of medium starch content)
  • 1 and 1/2 pounds raw potatoes, peeled (Yukon Gold)
  • 1/2 cup farmer's cheese or ricotta
  • 1/8 cup grated parmesan cheese, mozzarella, or cheese of your choice
  • 1 Tablespoons fresh chives, minced OR
  • 1 teaspoon dried chives or to taste
  • 2 to 4 Tablespoons heavy cream (as needed)
  • salt, pepper as needed
  • Oil as needed for pan frying

Instructions

  1. Cook potatoes until tender, mash fairly smooth. Measure out 2 and 1/2 cups. Set aside.
  2. Peel and grate the 1 and 1/2 pounds of raw potatoes on the large grate side of a box grater.
  3. Spread the grated potatoes onto a clean kitchen towel or cheesecloth and squeeze out all moisture you can.
  4. In a large bowl, combine the grated potatoes with the mashed potatoes. Season with 1 teaspoon of salt and ½ teaspoon of pepper. Set aside.
  5. OPTIONAL: You can also add caramelized onions to the potato mixture for added flavor. Set aside.
  6. In another bowl, combine the farmer's cheese OR cheese of your choice, the parmesan cheese, the chives, and 2 Tablespoons heavy cream. Add additional cream as needed to bring the mixture together into a thick paste.
    Assembly
  1. Take about a ¼ cup of potato mixture and form into a flat patty in your palm.
  2. Place about a tablespoon of the cheese filling into the center of the patty.
  3. Fold the potato mixture over the cheese filling, pinching it shut completely enclosing the cheese filling in the potato mixture. Add more potato mix to the top if needed to completely seal the filling inside.
  4. Slightly flatten the patty and shape it into an oval shape. Repeat with remaining potato and cheese mixture.
  5. In a nonstick skillet,add enough oil to cover bottom about 1/4 inch, heat to medium.
  6. Once oil is hot, add the pampushki. Cook the potato pampushki about 5 to 7 minutes per side, until golden brown.
  7. Drain the potato pampushki on paper towels.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2019/03/29/potato-pampushki-cheese-stuffed-potato-cakes/

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postheadericon Pagach (aka “Pierogi Pizza”)

Pagach is made of mashed potatoes and dough (sometimes with cabbage or sauerkraut instead of potatoes).  It originated as a Lenten dish in Slavic regions. It is popular in Northeastern Pennsylvania (the “Coal Region) and Southwestern Pennsylvania, areas shaped by the large population of Catholic immigrants from Eastern European countries. Pagach can be served as a side or as a main meal. Many times it is made as Friday night supper since it contains no meat. Pagach can be rolled out round or in a rectangle.

The potatoes or cabbage filling will often include butter, onions, cheese, and seasoning. Think of it as if a pierogi and a pizza fell in love and had an offspring! Although, traditionally, the filling is encased in the dough, in many restaurants in Northeast and Southwest Pennsylvania, it is constructed as a typical “pizza” — the fillings placed on top of the rolled out dough then baked, hence the name  “pierogie pizza”.  Pagach is delicious while it’s still warm, but can also be eaten the next day. You could use it as a side dish, a snack, or as a meal on its own.

This recipe is for the traditional construction of the filled and flattened pagach and includes three fillings: potato, cabbage, and sauerkraut.

Pagach (“Pierogi Pizza”)

Pagach (“Pierogi Pizza”)

Pagach

Ingredients

    Dough
  • 3/4 cup scalded milk
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 4 Tbsp. sugar
  • 3 Tbsp. shortening
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1 -1/4 ounce packet dry yeast (2-1/4 teaspoons)
  • 1/4 cup lukewarm water (105 F)
    Fillings
    Cabbage:
  • 1 medium head cabbage, chopped fine
  • Butter
  • Saute cabbage in butter until soft.
    Potato:
  • 3 medium potatoes, mashed with no added liquid
  • Chopped chives
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • Combine potatoes, chives, and egg
  • OPTIONAL: add shredded cheddar cheese to taste if desired
    Sauerkraut:
  • 1/2 pound sauerkraut, drained
  • Butter
  • Fry sauerkraut slowly in butter about 5 minutes.

Instructions

  1. Make filling of your choice, cool.
  2. In large bowl, pour milk over salt, sugar, and shortening. Cool to lukewarm.
  3. Dissolve yeast in lukewarm water.
  4. Add egg to lukewarm milk mixture.
  5. Add yeast/water mixture.
  6. Add about half the flour. Beat well.
  7. Add remainder of flour. Beat well.
  8. Turn out onto floured board and knead about 5 minutes.
  9. Place in greased bowl and let rise until doubled in bulk - 1-1/2 to 2 hours approx.
  10. Divide dough into 2 portions.
  11. Flatten/roll out one piece to about 2-inch thickness.
  12. Place desired filling in center.
  13. Draw up outside edges of dough to encase filling and pinch together to cover filling. The end result should look similar to a coin purse.
  14. Roll this "pouch" out gently to about 3/4 inch thick. Filling should remain inside dough. Think of a disk with the filling completely contained inside. Follow the same method for remaining half of the dough.
  15. Place each disk on a greased cookie sheet.
  16. Let rise about 1-½ hours.
  17. Bake at 375 F degrees about 20 to 30 minutes.
  18. When done, serve warm slathered with butter or sour cream. May also be brushed with heavy cream and sprinkled with sugar.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2019/03/26/pagach-aka-pierogi-pizza/

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postheadericon Easy Homemade Farmer’s Cheese

Farmer’s cheese is a fresh or un-aged cheese. It is also known as dry curd cheese or peasant cheese. This type of cheese is used in countless Eastern European cuisine recipes. It is also a part of Pa. Dutch (German) cuisine, often served as crumbles which resemble cottage cheese. Farmer’s cheese goes by many names in different languages: twaróg in Polish, surutka in Croatian and Serbian, tvaroh in Czech and Slovak, túró in Hungarian, varškės in Lithuanian, lapte covăsit in Romanian, tvorog in Russian, skuta in Slovenian, and syr in Ukrainian.

You can make farmer’s cheese easily at home with basic ingredients.. And you do not need a cheese press (unless you inherited one from your grandma … if you did, now is the time to dig it out of the “what am i ever gonna do with THIS thing” box!)

The whey or liquid by-product of the cheese making process is excellent to use when making bread; use the whey in place of water or milk. It can also be used as a soup base. Some people have even been known to drink it! As previously mentioned, it can be left crumbly or formed into a solid piece.  Some people slice it and fry it or eat it on bread with honey, some use the crumbles as a spread or in pierogi filling, add it to scrambled eggs as they’re cooking, or make it into a filling for blintzes. There are many uses, and you can add herbs like dill or chives, mix in basil and diced sun-dried tomatoes if desired.

Easy Homemade Farmer’s Cheese

Easy Homemade Farmer’s Cheese

Homemade Farmers Cheese

Ingredients

  • 2 quarts milk (whole; use pasteurized, instead of ultra-pasteurized, if available)
  • 2 cup buttermilk
  • 1 tablespoon white vinegar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • OPTIONAL: caraway seeds
  • OPTIONAL: herbs, additions of your choice
  • Cheesecloth or muslin
  • Butcher's or kitchen twine
  • Cooking Thermometer

Instructions

  1. In a heavy-bottomed pot, over low heat, slowly heat the milk up, stirring often, until it is just about to simmer (about 180 F).
  2. Stir in the buttermilk, and then the vinegar, and turn off the heat.
  3. Very slowly stir until you see the milk separating into curds (the solids) and whey (the liquid). Leave undisturbed for 10 minutes.
  4. If using caraway seeds, stir them in now.
  5. Line a large strainer with 3 layers of cheesecloth and place over a stockpot to catch the whey.
  6. After the 10 minutes are up, ladle the curds into the cheesecloth and allow the whey to drain for 10 minutes.
  7. Gather up the edges of the cheesecloth and tie a string around the top to form bundle. Tie the string to a wooden spoon/dowel/kitchen sink faucet and hang the cheese curds over the stockpot and continue draining for 30 minutes.
    To use as loose curds
  1. After draining, remove the cheese from the cloth, and transfer into a container. Stir in the salt and refrigerate. Cheese can be used for up to 5 days. Use as a spread, or as you would use cream cheese, or cottage cheese.
  2. Store it in a nonmetallic container, cover, and refrigerate.
    To Form Into a Solid Disk
  1. Once most of the liquid has dripped out, give a last good wring, tie the bag securely, place it between two clean cutting boards and put a heavy weight on top of it to squeeze out the rest of the liquid.
  2. Press the cheese somewhere it can be undisturbed for 8-10 hours or overnight to set. The longer you press the cheese, the drier it will be.
  3. Gently remove the cheesecloth, place the cheese on a plate, lightly salt it on all sides to taste, and put it on a rack to let it dry a little so a thin rind forms.
  4. Store it in a nonmetallic container, cover, and refrigerate.
  5. .
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2019/03/19/easy-homemade-farmers-cheese/

 

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postheadericon Battered French Toast

My family was never fond of French toast. We liked the flavor, but took issue with the mushy interior. One evening many moons ago at my Girl Scout meeting working on a cooking badge, the recipe used to teach us basics in the kitchen was for French toast — but this French toast was dipped in a flour based batter, not just eggs and milk.  We cut each piece of bread in half to make a triangle, dipped the slices in the batter, and fried them in a mix of butter and a little oil until browned and crispy on the edges. OMG, I was in love. The next day, I was anxious to share my new found love affair with this version of French toast with Mom and Dad and it was an immediate hit. I could not fry pieces quickly enough to keep up with the demand. To this day, THIS is the only French toast I will eat. Serving options are endless and your choice. My Dad was particularly fond of a good quality grape jam smeared on top. They are great with maple syrup, fruit syrup, caramel or chocolate syrup, fresh fruit, or any flavor jam or jelly. Use your imagination when it comes to bread choices, the only requirement is to use a bread that will stand up to dipping in the batter. Try raisin bread, brioche, panettone, French bread, Italian bread, even Texas toast. If you slice your own bread, make sure to slice to about 3/4 inch thickness.

Battered French Toast

Battered French Toast

Battered French Toast

Ingredients

  • Ingredients
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 2 tsp white sugar or brown sugar
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 cup milk
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tablespoon butter, melted plus additional solid butter for pan frying
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 10 to 12 slices of thick sliced hearty bread (about 3/4 inch thick)
  • Vegetable shortening or vegetable oil for frying

Instructions

  1. In a mixing bowl place the flour, baking powder, cinnamon and sugar together and mix well.
  2. In a square baking dish or wide bowl, whisk together the milk, eggs, butter and vanilla extract.
  3. Add dry ingredients to wet ingredients and whisk well. .Batter will have some lumps.
  4. Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium-high. Add 1 T butter and 1 T oil (or use all vegetable shortening) to pan and allow to heat through.
  5. Dip one side of a bread slice in batter, flip it over and dip the other. Allow excess batter to drip off.
  6. Place in heated pan. Repeat with enough slices to fill pan.
  7. Brown one side, flip, brown the other, adjusting heat to prevent burning.
  8. Repeat with remaining batter/bread. Add butter/oil/shortening as needed to fry.
  9. Serve immediately or hold in warm oven for serving.
  10. Sprinkle with powdered sugar if desired, serve with toppings of your choice.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2019/01/17/battered-french-toast/

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postheadericon Stove Rags or Lokshe

Made from mashed potatoes and flour, these are kind of like Slovak/Polish tortillas. You can make them with day old mashed potatoes or cook some potatoes, make them into your regular mashed potatoes and use them that way. They are thin pancakes made out of potato dough that are baked on a hot plate or an ungreased frying pan but “back in the day” they were often cooked right on the surface of the hot coal stove.

Stove Rags or Lokshe

Stove Rags or Lokshe

Stove Rags

Ingredients

  • 1 cup cold mashed potatoes( use left-over mashed potatoes or mash hot boiled potatoes. Add milk/cream ,butter, salt as you normally would.
  • Add 2 tbsp. sugar (optional) & cool if necessary.
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1/4 tsp salt

Instructions

  1. Mix all ingredients together and shape dough into balls a little larger than a walnut. Roll out dough into circles on a floured board until thin.
  2. Brown each in a dry skillet on medium high (cast iron works well), then turn over and brown on other side.
  3. Put on plate, brush with melted butter, stack on a pile until done.
  4. Roll up and enjoy. Jelly can be used, too.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2019/01/14/stove-rags-or-lokshe/

 

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postheadericon Meatless Borscht (Red Beet Soup)

A twelve-dish Christmas Eve supper is traditionally prepared in many Central European and Northern European cultures, especially those that were formerly part of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, including Polish, Lithuanian, Russian, Ukrainian and Belarusian. Many modern age descendants of immigrants from those areas who settled in the Coal Region embrace some, or all, of their heritage’s Christmas Eve and Day customs. The meal consists of twelve meatless dishes representing the twelve months of the year (and perhaps in more recent times, the 12 Apostles). The tradition of the supper can be traced back to pre-Christian times and connected with remembrance of the souls of deceased ancestors. Fish, mushrooms, pierogies with assorted fillings and sweets in some cuisines are part of the meal. The Christmas Eve supper is usually held under candlelight and starts in the evening after the first star appears in the sky. The star symbolizes the birth of Jesus in Christian tradition and a soul of deceased ancestors in pre-Christian beliefs. In Poland, Russia and Ukraine an extra plate and seat are always left at the table in the belief the spirits of the departed members of the family visit on the night. It is also very customary to be even more hospitable and invite unexpected visitors to the supper. This soup is often found on the table for Christmas Eve and is a meatless version because in many of these households, Christmas Eve is a fast day and no meat is consumed (In Ukraine, for example, some people abstain from eating all-together for the whole day, until the first star appears, when a 12 course meatless meal is served for the whole family, to break the fast.). To serve this at any time when it is not necessary to be meatless, use chicken or beef broth as the base. (Source of historical information: Wikipedia)

Meatless Borscht (Red Beet Soup)

Meatless Borscht (Red Beet Soup)

Meatless Borscht

Ingredients

  • 6 cups boiling water, or vegetable soup stock
  • 2 medium red beats, peeled and shredded
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1 rib celery, chopped
  • 1 carrot, shredded
  • 2 Tbs white vinegar, or lemon juice
  • 2 Tbs tomato paste
  • 1 cup Savoy cabbage, shredded
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 whole onion
  • 1 whole bay leaf
  • 10 whole peppercorns
  • 1 Tbs fresh dill , chopped
  • Sour cream for garnish

Instructions

  1. Saute 1 chopped onion in 2 Tbs oil until golden.
  2. Add shredded beats, carrot and celery.
  3. Cook for about 10 min.
  4. Add tomato paste and white vinegar, or lemon juice (I use vinegar)
  5. Cook for 10 minutes.
  6. Add to the boiling water or soup stock.
  7. Add whole onion, bay leaf , peppercorns.
  8. Bring to boil again and simmer for 20 min.
  9. Add shredded savoy cabbage.
  10. Simmer for another 15 minutes, or until cabbage is done.
  11. Remove the whole onion , bay leaf and peppercorns.
  12. Add salt and pepper to taste.
  13. Add chopped dill (for a more tangy flavor, you may add more vinegar, 1 tsp at a time).
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/12/21/meatless-borscht-red-beet-soup/

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