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Archive for the ‘Meatless’ Category

postheadericon Battered French Toast

My family was never fond of French toast. We liked the flavor, but took issue with the mushy interior. One evening many moons ago at my Girl Scout meeting working on a cooking badge, the recipe used to teach us basics in the kitchen was for French toast — but this French toast was dipped in a flour based batter, not just eggs and milk.  We cut each piece of bread in half to make a triangle, dipped the slices in the batter, and fried them in a mix of butter and a little oil until browned and crispy on the edges. OMG, I was in love. The next day, I was anxious to share my new found love affair with this version of French toast with Mom and Dad and it was an immediate hit. I could not fry pieces quickly enough to keep up with the demand. To this day, THIS is the only French toast I will eat. Serving options are endless and your choice. My Dad was particularly fond of a good quality grape jam smeared on top. They are great with maple syrup, fruit syrup, caramel or chocolate syrup, fresh fruit, or any flavor jam or jelly. Use your imagination when it comes to bread choices, the only requirement is to use a bread that will stand up to dipping in the batter. Try raisin bread, brioche, panettone, French bread, Italian bread, even Texas toast. If you slice your own bread, make sure to slice to about 3/4 inch thickness.

Battered French Toast

Battered French Toast

Battered French Toast

Ingredients

  • Ingredients
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 2 tsp white sugar or brown sugar
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 cup milk
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tablespoon butter, melted plus additional solid butter for pan frying
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 10 to 12 slices of thick sliced hearty bread (about 3/4 inch thick)
  • Vegetable shortening or vegetable oil for frying

Instructions

  1. In a mixing bowl place the flour, baking powder, cinnamon and sugar together and mix well.
  2. In a square baking dish or wide bowl, whisk together the milk, eggs, butter and vanilla extract.
  3. Add dry ingredients to wet ingredients and whisk well. .Batter will have some lumps.
  4. Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium-high. Add 1 T butter and 1 T oil (or use all vegetable shortening) to pan and allow to heat through.
  5. Dip one side of a bread slice in batter, flip it over and dip the other. Allow excess batter to drip off.
  6. Place in heated pan. Repeat with enough slices to fill pan.
  7. Brown one side, flip, brown the other, adjusting heat to prevent burning.
  8. Repeat with remaining batter/bread. Add butter/oil/shortening as needed to fry.
  9. Serve immediately or hold in warm oven for serving.
  10. Sprinkle with powdered sugar if desired, serve with toppings of your choice.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2019/01/17/battered-french-toast/

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postheadericon Stove Rags or Lokshe

Made from mashed potatoes and flour, these are kind of like Slovak/Polish tortillas. You can make them with day old mashed potatoes or cook some potatoes, make them into your regular mashed potatoes and use them that way. They are thin pancakes made out of potato dough that are baked on a hot plate or an ungreased frying pan but “back in the day” they were often cooked right on the surface of the hot coal stove.

Stove Rags or Lokshe

Stove Rags or Lokshe

Stove Rags

Ingredients

  • 1 cup cold mashed potatoes( use left-over mashed potatoes or mash hot boiled potatoes. Add milk/cream ,butter, salt as you normally would.
  • Add 2 tbsp. sugar (optional) & cool if necessary.
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1/4 tsp salt

Instructions

  1. Mix all ingredients together and shape dough into balls a little larger than a walnut. Roll out dough into circles on a floured board until thin.
  2. Brown each in a dry skillet on medium high (cast iron works well), then turn over and brown on other side.
  3. Put on plate, brush with melted butter, stack on a pile until done.
  4. Roll up and enjoy. Jelly can be used, too.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2019/01/14/stove-rags-or-lokshe/

 

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postheadericon Meatless Borscht (Red Beet Soup)

A twelve-dish Christmas Eve supper is traditionally prepared in many Central European and Northern European cultures, especially those that were formerly part of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, including Polish, Lithuanian, Russian, Ukrainian and Belarusian. Many modern age descendants of immigrants from those areas who settled in the Coal Region embrace some, or all, of their heritage’s Christmas Eve and Day customs. The meal consists of twelve meatless dishes representing the twelve months of the year (and perhaps in more recent times, the 12 Apostles). The tradition of the supper can be traced back to pre-Christian times and connected with remembrance of the souls of deceased ancestors. Fish, mushrooms, pierogies with assorted fillings and sweets in some cuisines are part of the meal. The Christmas Eve supper is usually held under candlelight and starts in the evening after the first star appears in the sky. The star symbolizes the birth of Jesus in Christian tradition and a soul of deceased ancestors in pre-Christian beliefs. In Poland, Russia and Ukraine an extra plate and seat are always left at the table in the belief the spirits of the departed members of the family visit on the night. It is also very customary to be even more hospitable and invite unexpected visitors to the supper. This soup is often found on the table for Christmas Eve and is a meatless version because in many of these households, Christmas Eve is a fast day and no meat is consumed (In Ukraine, for example, some people abstain from eating all-together for the whole day, until the first star appears, when a 12 course meatless meal is served for the whole family, to break the fast.). To serve this at any time when it is not necessary to be meatless, use chicken or beef broth as the base. (Source of historical information: Wikipedia)

Meatless Borscht (Red Beet Soup)

Meatless Borscht (Red Beet Soup)

Meatless Borscht

Ingredients

  • 6 cups boiling water, or vegetable soup stock
  • 2 medium red beats, peeled and shredded
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1 rib celery, chopped
  • 1 carrot, shredded
  • 2 Tbs white vinegar, or lemon juice
  • 2 Tbs tomato paste
  • 1 cup Savoy cabbage, shredded
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 whole onion
  • 1 whole bay leaf
  • 10 whole peppercorns
  • 1 Tbs fresh dill , chopped
  • Sour cream for garnish

Instructions

  1. Saute 1 chopped onion in 2 Tbs oil until golden.
  2. Add shredded beats, carrot and celery.
  3. Cook for about 10 min.
  4. Add tomato paste and white vinegar, or lemon juice (I use vinegar)
  5. Cook for 10 minutes.
  6. Add to the boiling water or soup stock.
  7. Add whole onion, bay leaf , peppercorns.
  8. Bring to boil again and simmer for 20 min.
  9. Add shredded savoy cabbage.
  10. Simmer for another 15 minutes, or until cabbage is done.
  11. Remove the whole onion , bay leaf and peppercorns.
  12. Add salt and pepper to taste.
  13. Add chopped dill (for a more tangy flavor, you may add more vinegar, 1 tsp at a time).
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/12/21/meatless-borscht-red-beet-soup/

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postheadericon Pa Dutch Braised Red Cabbage

I have a very special fondness for the traditional German and Pa Dutch “sweet/sour” flavor. And since cabbage is one of my favorite vegetables, I am always looking for ways to serve it to keeps things exciting!. This dish features the very traditional “Dutchie” sweet/sour flavor and uses red cabbage (and BACON!!). I love this braised cabbage alongside roasted pork loin, roast beef, or even turkey, but my absolute favorite way to enjoy this is alongside a lovely piece (or two) of pan-fried fresh (or smoked) sausage made by one of the many local meat shops or butchers still plentiful in the Coal Region;  the sausages nestled next to a mound of fluffy mashed potatoes or browned butter egg noodles.  Budget friendly, left-over friendly, and very easy to prepare, I encourage you to give it a try. (And if you can, get some true, country style bacon from one of the great butchers, shops, or farmers’ markets in the Coal Region or Pa Dutch country, too!)

Pa Dutch Braised Red Cabbage

Pa Dutch Braised Red Cabbage

German Braised Red Cabbage

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup cider vinegar
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1/4 cup packed brown sugar
  • 10 cups red cabbage, shredded
  • 2 bacon strips, diced
  • 1 medium tart apple, peeled and chopped
  • 1/2 cup chopped onion
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves

Instructions

  1. In a large bowl, stir the cider vinegar and sugars until sugars are dissolved. Add cabbage; toss to coat. Set aside for 10 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, in a large frying pan or dutch oven with lid, cook bacon over medium heat until crisp. Remove bacon to paper towels to drain.
  3. In the drippings left in the pan, saute apple and onion until tender, 5 to 10 minutes.
  4. Stir in water and cabbage mixture. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer for 35 to 40 minutes.
  5. Stir in the remaining ingredients. Simmer, uncovered, several more minutes or until cabbage is tender. Sprinkle with reserved bacon before serving.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/11/21/pa-dutch-braised-red-cabbage/

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postheadericon Handmade Pierogi

Ah, the beloved Coal Region favorite — pierogi. Not only do many meals revolve around pierogi, but it is the center of much social interaction, especially in generations gone by.  “Church ladies” gather in church kitchens and turn out pierogi for fundraising sales, block parties, or church festivals by the hundreds of dozen — and we Coal Region folks are quite willing to stand in long lines at those events to get them. (You meet nice people standing in the pierogi concession line.) Pierogi is a a traditional food in many cuisines of Eastern Europe and they found themselves becoming a staple in the Coal Region thanks to the influx of immigrants to the Anthracite region who came to America to work in the mines. What started out as a peasant food has evolved into a true classic. Pierogi are not difficult to make.  I repeat – not difficult!! Therefore, I suggest you pass over the in-the-grocery-store frozen variety and, at least once in your life, MAKE YOUR OWN! This recipe for the dough includes sour cream; some recipes do not, but I believe the addition of sour cream makes a more tender dough and I had an iconic “church lady” assure me that was correct (so, that’s good enough for me). Pierogi are filled with savory or sweet fillings, and I have included the very popular potato and cheese filling and a sauerkraut and potato filling. This recipe  makes a LOT, but if you are making pierogi, it makes sense to make a bunch and freeze some for future use. However, you can scale it down. They freeze wonderfully and last a long time in the freezer.

*** READ BEFORE STARTING THIS RECIPE and KEEP THESE POINTS IN MIND ***

  • You do not NEED fancy equipment to form pierogi.  All you NEED is your hands, a 3-3/4 to 4 inch round item capable of cutting the dough – like a drinking glass, and a rolling pin  Anything more than that — like an electric stand mixer, a metal cutter, or pastry brush to wet the dough edges for sealing is icing on the cake.
  • You do not have to complete all the steps involved at one time or in one day.  You can make the filling(s) a day or so ahead, make the dough the evening before, and put them all together the next day.
  • The water for cooking should be kept at a boil and they will float to the top when finished cooking.
  • When cutting circles of dough, cut as closely together as possible to get as many as you can from the rolled out dough. The scraps can be gently gathered and placed together to roll again and cut.
  • Your pierogi should be nicely filled, with no air bubbles inside, and just enough dough rim around the edge to assure a tight seal when pinched shut.
  • Pierogi can be frozen raw or cooked. On a parchment-lined baking sheet, arrange raw or cooked, cooled pierogi, making sure the ends don’t touch. Place in freezer. Freeze until solid, remove them from the tray and place in freezer bags. If frozen un-cooked, boil to cook when ready to serve.

Handmade Pierogi

Yield: 14 to 15 dozen

Handmade Pierogi

Making Homemade Pierogi

Ingredients

    For the Dough
  • 6 cups all purpose flour
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 cup sour cream (full fat)
  • 2 whole eggs
  • 1-1/2 cups water
    Potato Cheddar Filling
  • 5 lbs russet potatoes, peeled and cut into small cubes
  • 1 medium sweet onion, finely diced
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 1 lb good quality sharp cheddar cheese, grated (use really good cheese!)
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • Salt and pepper to taste
    Sauerkraut Filling
  • 2-1/2 lbs russet potatoes, peeled and cut into small cubes
  • 2 cups sauerkraut
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 1 cup panko breadcrumbs
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

    Making the Dough
  1. Mix the flour and salt in a large bowl. In a smaller bowl, mix sour cream, water and eggs until well blended.
  2. Make a well in the center of the flour,/salt mixture and pour in the sour cream/water/eggs mixture. Mix together by hand or with the dough hook of a stand mixer until it comes together adjusting with additional flour or water 1 tablespoon at a time until a pliable, soft dough is formed.
  3. On a lightly floured surface (or in the stand mixer) knead until the dough is no longer sticky and the surface is smooth.
  4. Remove from bowl, cut into four equal pieces, flatten into a disk and wrap each in plastic wrap. Place in refrigerator at least 2 hours or overnight before rolling out.
    Making the Potato Cheddar Filling
  1. Place peeled, cubed potatoes into a pot and cover them with cold water. Salt the water to taste (potatoes need a generous amount of salt). bring to boil, reduce heat and cook until fork-tender.
  2. Meanwhile, melt the butter in a frying pan then add the onion and some salt and pepper and cook slowly until the onion is soft but not browned.
  3. Drain cooked potatoes and let sit to dry or return to pot and shake lightly over low heat to evaporate any remaining moisture.
  4. While potatoes are still warm, mash them until smooth. Add the cooked onions and butter, the sour cream, and the grated cheese and mix very well. The potato mixture will be stiff. Make sure to season well with salt and pepper. Cool completely or refrigerate until ready to use.
    Making the Sauerkraut Filling
  1. Peel and cube the potatoes. Boil the potatoes in generously salted water until fork tender. Drain in a colander and allow to dry for a minute or two. Mash with a hand masher until fairly smoothly mashed. Add the sauerkraut, panko crumbs and sour cream. Season with salt & pepper and mix together. Taste and adjust seasoning as needed.
    Assembling the Pierogi
  1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Line some baking sheets with parchment to hold the uncooked pierogi.
  2. Take one disk and, flouring surface lightly, roll out the dough to about 1/8th to 1/16th inch thickness. Make sure it is not sticking while you roll it out and move it around as you need to.
  3. Brush off any excess flour and use your cutter to cut circles from the rolled dough. Remove the scrap pieces and store them covered to re-roll the scraps together later.
  4. Brush the edge of each circle with your finger or brush lightly dipped in water.
  5. Place about a spoonful of filling in the center of each round. Fold the dough in half around the filling and pinch the edges closed (you can also crimp the edges with the tines of a fork to help assure sealing). Any filling at the edges will prevent the edges from sealing properly. Press out any air bubbles as you seal them up. Lay the pinched pierogi on the parchment lined trays.
  6. Drop pierogi, in small batches, into the gently boiling water. Once they float, cook another minute, then remove with a slotted spoon. Keep the water boiling while cooking.
  7. At this point, you will likely lose some to poorly sealed seams or breakage.
  8. When all are cooked, either eat or freeze!
  9. A popular way to serve pierogi is topped with sauteed onion in butter. Roughly chop or thinly slice some onion, melt some butter in a frying pan, add salt and pepper to taste and saute the onions until soft and lightly browned. Add the boiled or thawed pierogi, heat through and brown one side of the pierogi lightly if desired.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/11/03/handmade-pierogi/

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postheadericon Polish Kopytka

Kopytka means little hooves in Polish; the little shapes are supposed to resemble cloven hooves. ( kapytki in Lithuanian cuisine). Kopytka are very similar to Italian gnocchi in that they are made from cooked potatoes, egg, and flour.  Kopytka is not the same as Polish potato dumplings (Kartoflane Kluski) which uses grated raw potatoes in the dough.  These little pillow of deliciousness have made many a Coal Cracker happy when they appear on the table for a meal.  So many of us remember our Nanas making them. The mashed potatoes for Kopytka need to be on the dry side, so don’t use leftover mashed potatoes that you’ve prepared with milk and butter. Kopytka is often served with buttered breadcrumbs (polonaise style), gravy, pan drippings, or fry the dumplings to brown them, or fry and serve them with goulash. There are a lot of ways to serve and enjoy this Coal Region favorite!

Polish Kopytka

 

Kopytka

Ingredients

  • 1-1/2 pounds russet potatoes, cooked in their jackets, peeled and mashed or run through a food mill
  • 1 large beaten egg
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour or as needed
  • Polonaise Topping:
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 3 tablespoons fresh white breadcrumbs

Instructions

  1. Place mashed potatoes in a large bowl.
  2. Add egg, salt and flour as needed to form a smooth, cohesive dough without overworking it (the dough will be tough if overworked).
  3. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil.
  4. Lightly flour your work surface and hands and roll pieces of the dough into "ropes" about 1/2 inch in diameter. Cut at an angle into approximately 1 inch to 1-1/2 inch pieces. Repeat with remainder of dough.
  5. Drop the cut dumplings into the boiling water. Avoid crowding and work in batches if necessary. Return the water to boiling, reduce to slow boil and cook 2 - 5 minutes, testing for desired doneness.
  6. Remove cooked dumplings to a colander and drain.
  7. If serving Polonaise-style, prepare topping by melting the butter in a small fry pan. Add the breadcrumbs and fry for 3 - 4 minutes or until golden brown. Transfer drained dumplings to a serving dish and sprinkle the buttered breadcrumbs on top.
  8. Note: If serving these dumplings with pan juices, omit the Polonaise topping step.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/10/18/polish-kopytka/

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postheadericon Schmearcase (Cottage Cheese) and Apple Butter

This is not a “recipe” in the typical  sense, but is definitely a comfort food enjoyed in the Coal Region and PA Dutch country and I felt it deserved a shout-out. It is not at all unusual to find it on salad bars or as a side dish offering in restaurants and diners in the region. Its popularity does extend to other areas, including the Baltimore, MD area. In Pa Dutch, cottage cheese is known as schmearcase  (smearcase). You can make your own schmearcase, but the extensive availability of commercially made cottage cheese means I just buy my favorite brand and go from there. Being in the Coal Region and Pa Dutch country, I have easy access to a  multitude of brands of apple butter so, once again even though I CAN make my own, I often just purchase a jar from a local market. If you do not have access to small batch producers of apple butter and want to find it in stores, Musselman’s Apple Butter is distributed nationwide, so check with your local grocer. I like both large curd and small curd cottage cheese with apple butter.

Schmearcase and Apple Butter “recipe”
Cottage cheese of your choice
Apple Butter of your choice
Take a dab of apple butter and plop it on to a mound of cottage cheese.  That’s it!

I like my schmearcase and apple butter in lots of ways. Just to name a FEW:

  • In a bowl (then I swirl them together)
  • On toast
  • On graham crackers
  • On rice cakes
  • On freshly baked, still warm homemade bread (yummmm!)
  • On a toasted English Muffin
  • Between two slices of bread as a sandwich

Schmearcase (Cottage Cheese) and Apple Butter

Schmearcase and Apple Butter Sandwich

 

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postheadericon AuGratin Cabbage

I love cabbage. It is the Pa Dutch and Eastern European influence of the Coal Region that introduced me to this lovely veggie as a child.  I love it in cold dishes and I love it cooked. Add cheese and buttery crumbs to the mix and I cannot wait for this casserole to come out of the oven. It consists of a smooth, creamy, cheesy sauce tossed with par-boiled cabbage then topped with buttery crumbs and baked until browned and bubbling. It is a wonderful way to use up that partial head of cabbage in the veggie bin. For an extra cheese kick, use finely crushed cheese crackers like Goldfish or Cheez-its for the topping crumbs. Either give the cracker a whirl in the food processor until fine, or place the crackers in a zip lock bag and pound with a rolling pin.  Shake the bag periodically to move the larger un-crushed pieces around and repeat until all the pieces are finely crushed.

AuGratin Cabbage

AuGratin Cabbage

Ingredients

  • Approximately 4 cups shredded Cabbage, medium shred (about 1/2")
  • 3 T flour
  • 3 T butter
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • pepper to taste
  • 1-1/2 cups whole milk
  • 1 cup shredded sharp cheddar
  • 1/2 cup finely crushed crackers OR bread crumbs (Goldfish, Cheez-it, Ritz, Keebler Club crackers, etc)
  • 2 T melted butter

Instructions

  1. Cook cabbage in a small amount of lightly salted water with a pinch of sugar added. Do not overcook, should be tender-crisp.
  2. Prepare sauce:
  3. Melt 3 T butter in sauce pan, add flour, salt and pepper. Stir and cook, stirring constantly, for 2 minutes to cook the flour. Add in milk gradually. Cook until thickened. Remove from heat. Stir in cheese until melted and smooth.
  4. Drain water from cabbage. Alternate layers of cabbage and sauce into a greased casserole.
  5. Melt 2 T butter and toss with the 1/2 cup crumbs of your choice until well coated., Sprinkle top of casserole evenly with crumbs.
  6. Bake at 350 degrees for 25 - 30 minutes or till bubbling and crumbs are browned.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/10/09/augratin-cabbage/

 

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postheadericon Browned Butter Egg Noodles

It does not get any simpler than this…Tender cooked egg noodles tossed with nutty, roasted browned butter and bread crumbs. I am Dutchie and Coal Cracker through and through and never met a noodle I didn’t like.  Top them with browned butter and I am in love. This is a dish that can accompany many meats and vegetables as a side, especially yummy with gravy or sauces, but I have a confession — I love them all by themselves, nestled in the middle of a warm plate, just begging to be adored and devoured! My childhood is filled with memories of Mom making these and they are still an absolute favorite of mine. A tip: do not walk away while browning the butter.  It can go from “not-quite-there-yet” to “well, that didn’t go as planned burned” almost in the blink of an eye.

Browned Butter Noodles

Browned Butter Egg Noodles

Ingredients

  • 8 ounces dried egg noodles, size noodle of your choice from thin to very wide
  • 4 tablespoons butter (or more to taste)
  • 1/2 cup plain dried breadcrumbs
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Instructions

  1. Cook the noodles in lightly salted water according to package directions. Drain and return to pot.
  2. Heat the butter in a small saucepan over medium-high heat until brown, watching carefully to make sure it does not burn. Heat slowly, stir often, and DO NOT WALK AWAY!
  3. Once lightly brown and emitting a slight "nutty" fragrance, immediately remove from the heat.
  4. Add breadcrumbs and stir until the crumbs are well coated. Add the drained noodles, toss to coat and season to taste with salt and pepper.
  5. Sprinkle with the parsley when serving. Serve immediately.
  6. Notes: You can use more or less butter as desired. When browning butter, stir at the bottom of the pan. That is where the butter browns and burns the fastest. If your pan has a dark interior, you will have to scoop some of the butter into a spoon to check the color.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/09/19/browned-butter-egg-noodles/

 

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postheadericon Amish Baked Corn

Corn dishes are a staple in Pa Dutch country.  Frozen can also be used, but I prefer well-drained Niblets for this recipe. This is often served on holiday tables. This is a super-easy side dish to dress up any meal.

Amish Baked Corn

Amish Baked Corn

Ingredients

  • 2 eggs
  • 1 (8 oz.) sour cream
  • 2 cups fresh corn kernels OR 2 cups canned whole kernel corn, drained
  • 2/3 c. butter, melted
  • 1 can cream-style corn
  • 1 box Jiffy corn bread mix

Instructions

  1. Heat oven to 350°. Beat eggs; add sour cream. Stir in melted butter, corn and corn bread mix. Pour into buttered 9 x 13-inch dish. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes until slightly browned. Do not over bake.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/09/12/amish-baked-corn/

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