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Archive for the ‘Pies’ Category

postheadericon Italian Easter Rice Pie (Pastiera di Riso)

Every cook has their own version of this popular pie that appears on many tables in Italian-American homes in the Coal Region where large numbers of Italians settled as immigrants to America. Of the twenty-three million people who emigrated from foreign countries to live in the United States by the start of World War I, nearly five million were from Italy. (Lackawanna County in NE Pa. boasts one of the nation’s largest and most diverse Italian American populations.) Easter pie (pastiera) is found all over Italy, but its origins are Neapolitan where these pies with a tender, cookie-like crust filled with fresh ricotta cheese and rice and sweetened with sugar, were made in batches, wrapped in clear cellophane, and given away as Easter gifts.  Today, some cooks add chopped candied orange peel, citron, mixed fruits and/or chocolate chips to their pie, some do not. There is no “right” or “wrong” recipe – you should make it to suit your family’s tastes – every version is delicious!

Italian Easter Rice Pie

Yield: 2 pies

Italian Easter Rice Pie

Easter Rice Pie

Ingredients

    Pastry
  • 2-1/2 pounds flour (about 6 cups, as needed)
  • 2 cups Sugar
  • 3/4 cup unsalted Butter
  • 1 cup Cold Water
    Filling
  • 1/2 pound Long Grain or Arborio Rice
  • 2 cups Cold Water
  • 1 qt whole Milk, heated just to scalding
  • 1 - 1/2 cups Sugar
  • 1 pound Ricotta Cheese, well drained
  • 6 Large Eggs, beaten
  • 1 tsp Cinnamon
  • 1/2 cup Finely Chopped Candied Citron
  • Grated zest from 1/2 of a Large Orange

Instructions

    Pastry
  1. In a large bowl, combine the flour and sugar, then cut in the butter until it looks like coarse corn meal.
  2. Add the water, a little at a time, just until it just forms a ball; you may not need to use all the water.
  3. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface, and quickly knead it once or twice, into a slightly flattened ball, but don't overwork dough.
  4. Wrap in plastic wrap and chill the dough, about an hour.
  5. Divide the chilled dough in two, and roll out each piece to fit a 9 inch, deep dish pie pan.
  6. If there is any dough leftover, roll and cut it into strips for a lattice top.
    Filling
  1. While the dough is chilling, preheat the oven to 400F degrees.
  2. In a large saucepan, bring the water and rice to a boil, then gently boil on medium heat for 10 minutes.
  3. Drain the rice and return it to the saucepan with the heated milk. Cook on medium low heat for 15 minutes.
  4. Remove from heat and add the sugar and ricotta, stirring well.
  5. Add the beaten egg, cinnamon, citron and orange peel. Mix well and pour into 2 prepared deep dish pie pans.
  6. Decorate the top with any extra dough strips to make a lattice top and flute the edge.
  7. Place the pies in the oven and immediately turn the temperature down to 350 F degrees.
  8. Bake for 35-45 minutes, or until a knife inserted near the center comes out clean. It may be necessary to cover the edge with some foil if it is browning too quickly.
  9. Cool, chill, and cut into wedges to serve.

Notes

To chop the citron place it in food processor with some of the sugar for the filling. Process it until there are no large chunks, it should be fairly fine.

http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2019/04/14/italian-easter-rice-pie-pastiera-di-riso/

 

 

 

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postheadericon Cool and Creamy Jello Pie

I love this pie and the recipe is a classic that has been around for a long time. It is so quick and easy you will find yourself wanting to experiment with other gelatin flavors; lemon, lime, orange, raspberry, peach – use your imagination. You can top it with additional whipped topping and garnish with fruit or serve it as is. You can choose to add fruit to the filling or not, it is up to you. If adding fruit, use a cup of small fruits or chopped pieces; make sure it is dry (fresh blueberries) or well drained (chopped canned peaches). This is a very family friendly recipe, quick to make, and kids love it.  This is a 3 or 4 ingredient dessert that is a welcomed light ending to any meal and is especially refreshing as the weather warms here in the Coal Region as spring approaches. Try it frozen in the hot summer months.

Cool and Creamy Jello Pie

Cool and Creamy Jello Pie

Jello Pie

Ingredients

  • 2 cups fresh strawberries, divided
  • 2/3 cup boiling water
  • 1 pkg. (3 oz.) JELL-O Strawberry Flavor Gelatin
  • ice cubes
  • 1/2 cup cold water
  • 1 tub (8 oz.) Cool Whip Topping, thawed
  • 1 ready-to-use reduced-fat graham cracker or shortbread crust (6 oz.)

Instructions

  1. Slice 1 cup strawberries; refrigerate for later use. Chop remaining strawberries; set aside.
  2. Add boiling water to gelatin mix; stir 2 min. until completely dissolved.
  3. Add enough ice to cold water to measure 1 cup. Add to gelatin; stir until slightly thickened. Remove any unmelted ice.
  4. Whisk in COOL WHIP. Stir in chopped strawberries. Refrigerate 20 to 30 min. or until mixture is very thick and will mound. Spoon into crust.
  5. Refrigerate 6 hours or until firm. Top with sliced berries just before serving.

Notes

You may use any flavor gelatin and add appropriate fruit to the filling.

http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2019/02/24/cool-and-creamy-jello-pie/

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postheadericon Strawberry Rhubarb Crumb Pie

When I was  child in the 60s, I lived in a typical coal region home in a very small town in Schuylkill County. Unlike some towns, ours had mostly single family homes rather than “double-blocks” (known as “duplexs” or “two-family” elsewhere), many having nicely sized yards which were “landsca1ped” by the homeowners with plants, shrubs, and trees that reflected the tastes of the family living there. My home and back yard were no different. In addition to the sand pit and play area Dad put in and the metal swing set with the facing double bench swing on which my Pappy and his good friend, our next door neighbor, spent equally as much time on sitting toe to toe chatting and smoking their pipes as I did playing on it, there were “the gardens”.  Never to grace the pages of Better Homes and Gardens, they never-the-less brought pleasure to us. One consisted of a patch on which my Dad fed the compost pile all winter long, then turned over the soil each summer and filled with a variety of tomato starter plants bought at the local hardware store. The other patch, located directly behind the house, consisted of two peony bushes serving as bookends to the rest of the patch’s contents — a bleeding heart plant, 2 propane tanks (for the kitchen stove) and the pride and joy of my Nana — a rhubarb plant that made its presence known every spring without fail. I have many a memory of playing on the swing set, hearing the back porch door squeak as it opened then bang shut, watched my Nana come around the back of the house and harvest her rhubarb. She would gather  up the bottom hem of her cotton, ric-rac trimmed apron making a “pouch” into which she dropped the reddish tinted stalks of freshly cut rhubarb. She would turn and head to the kitchen and I knew a rhubarb crumb pie would soon be on the table. Nana loved things made with just rhubarb; the rest of the family, not so much. And so, her rhubarb crumb pie became this Strawberry Rhubarb Crumb Pie.  (Rhubarb can also be found in supermarkets in many areas).

Strawberry Rhubarb Crumb Pie

Strawberry Rhubarb Crumb Pie

Strawberry Rhubarb Crumb Pie

Ingredients

    Crust
  • 1 - 9 inch unbaked pie crust, your favorite recipe or store bought
    Filling
  • 3 cups rhubarb, chopped into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 2 cups strawberries, hulled and sliced thinly
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup white sugar
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • Pinch of salt
    Crumbs
  • 1/2 cup cold unsalted butter, cubed
  • 1/4 cup all purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup quick cook oats
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Instructions

  1. Prepare crust, refrigerate until ready to use.
  2. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F, line a cookie or baking sheet with parchment or foil
  3. Toss together rhubarb, strawberries, brown sugar, white sugar, flour, lemon juice, and salt in a bowl. Combine well then set aside.
  4. Prepare the crumbs next.
    Crumbs
  1. In a bowl, mix together the butter, flour, brown sugar, quick oats, and cinnamon. Mix by hand or with pastry blender until crumbs form.
    Assembly
  1. Remove your prepared pie crust in pan from the refrigerator.
  2. Fill the crust with the strawberry rhubarb mixture. evenly.
  3. Sprinkle evenly with the crumble topping.
  4. Place the pie on the baking sheet, place in oven, and bake for 15 minutes at 400 degrees F. Then, reduce the temperature to 350 degrees and continue baking for 35 to 45 minutes until filling is bubbling and the top is browned.
  5. Allow pie to cool for at least four hours to allow the filling to set before cutting..
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2019/02/04/strawberry-rhubarb-crumb-pie/

My exact swing set when I was young.

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postheadericon Italian Ricotta Pie

The Coal Region is a melting pot of ethnic influences; English, Welsh, Irish and German immigrants formed a large portion of the initial flow of immigrants after the American Civil War in the late 1800s followed by Polish, Slovak, Ruthenian, Ukrainian, Hungarian, Italian, Russian and Lithuanian immigrants. The influence of these immigrant populations is still strongly felt in the region, with various towns possessing pronounced ethnic characters and cuisine.  This recipe pays homage to those of us in the Coal region with Italian heritage. This is a very old recipe passed down through many generations. Like so many other dishes, every family has their own cherished version of this classic.  This recipe does not use butter in the crust but instead uses extra virgin olive oil which gives the crust a crispy, flaky, cookie-like texture on the outer edges and the bottom crust under the ricotta cheese filling is slightly cake-like in texture. Optional, but not included in the original recipe: add 1/4 cup mini chocolate chips or 1 tablespoon lemon zest to the filling before baking.

Italian Ricotta Pie

Italian Ricotta Pie

Ricotta Pie

Ingredients

    Crust
  • 1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 egg yolks (save egg whites for filling)
  • 1/3 cup whole milk
  • 1/3 cup good quality olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon almond extract
    Filling
  • 2 cups whole milk ricotta cheese
  • 1/2 granulated sugar
  • 3 whole eggs, beaten
  • 2 egg whites (saved from making the crust)
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
    Prep the oven
  1. Bring 2 or more quarts of water to boil on stove. In the bottom rack of the preheated oven, place a baking dish such as a 9×13-inch baking dish and fill with the hot, boiled water. Place another oven rack directly over that to next higher rack position.
    Make the pie dough
  1. In a large bowl, sift flour, baking powder and sugar. Stir to combine.
  2. In a smaller bowl combine egg yolks, milk, olive oil, and both extracts.
  3. Make a hole in the center of the flour and pour in liquid. With a wooden spoon, mix to combine. (If the mixture gets too difficult to combine with a wooden spoon, used your hands to finish mixing).
  4. Flour your countertop well and place the dough ball in the center, pressing to form a round disc. Flour a rolling pin and gently roll to a circle an inch or two larger than a deep dish 9-inch pie plate. (or roll between two pieces of parchment paper)
  5. Move the rolled dough to the pie plate. This dough is soft and delicate so be gentle.
  6. Use your fingers to form and press the dough into the the pie dish, crimping the top edge all the way around. If the dough tears, just patch it by pressing pieces together - no one will ever know! Set aside.
    Make the Filling
  1. Place the ricotta in a large bowl and mix in sugar until combined.
  2. Add whole eggs, egg whites and vanilla and stir to combine with a wooden spoon or wire whisk.
  3. Pour the filling directly into unbaked crust. Cover the crust edge with foil or pie crust shield so the edges don’t get too browned as the pie bakes.
  4. Place pie in the center of oven on the rack set over the water bath and bake for one hour and ten minutes. Turn off oven but leave the pie in the oven for ten more minutes. (Don’t open the oven door during any of the time that the pie is in the oven.)
  5. Remove the pie from the oven and place on a wire rack to cool completely before refrigerating – if you put the pie in the refrigerator while still warm, it will weep slightly and collect moisture on top.)
  6. Chill overnight uncovered. Cut and serve.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/10/31/italian-ricotta-pie/

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postheadericon Montgomery Pie

This is a traditional Pennsylvania Dutch dessert. Different from Shoo Fly Pie and its bold molasses bottom layer and crunchy upper layer of crumbs, Montgomery Pie features a molasses and LEMON laced bottom filling layer and a light buttermilk-cake top. It’s a very old hand-written recipe from my very old and banged up recipe file and is a pie that has a long history in Amish and Pa. Dutch households. Use your favorite pie crust recipe, refrigerated crust, or frozen for this, your choice.

Pa. Dutch Montgomery Pie

Montgomery Pie

Ingredients

  • Pastry for one 9 inch pie
  • BOTTOM LAYER
  • 1/2 cup molasses
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour
  • 3 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 1 Tbsp fresh lemon zest
  • TOP LAYER
  • 1/4 cup unsalted butter
  • 2/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 cup buttermilk (or sour milk = 1/2 cup whole milk + 1-1/2 tsp white vinegar. Mix and allow to stand 10 minutes)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 375°F.
  2. BOTTOM LAYER:
  3. Thoroughly combine molasses, sugar, egg, water, flour, lemon juice and zest. Pour the batter into the unbaked pie shell; set the pie aside.
  4. TOP LAYER:
  5. Cream the butter and sugar together until light and fluffy. Add the egg and beat thoroughly.
  6. Sift the remaining flour and baking soda together and then add it to the creamed mixture alternately with the buttermilk. Mix until well blended. Add it to the pie shell, spreading it evenly over the bottom layer.
  7. Place the pie in the oven, and bake for 35 to 40 minutes or until the top is lightly browned across the entire surface. Let cool completely before serving.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/10/10/montgomery-pie/

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postheadericon Pa. Dutch Peanut Butter Nugget Pie

This peanut butter pie is created from an easy to cook, homemade pudding filling, sprinkled with layers of super-easy to make peanut butter nuggets. It is not the typical cream cheese based PB pie filling.  Now, I am a true lover of anything cream cheese, but this pie holds its own without it. You can top it with freshly whipped cream, purchased whipped cream, or whipped topping. You also have several options for crusts for your creation. For added embellishment when serving, garnish with chocolate syrup or a ribbon of hot fudge if you want a little something “extra”.

Pa Dutch Peanut Butter Nugget Pie

Pa. Dutch Peanut Butter Nugget Pie

Ingredients

  • 4 cups cold whole milk, divided
  • 1/2 cup cornstarch
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 3 large egg yolks
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2/3 cup white sugar
  • 1 cup powdered sugar (confectioner's sugar)
  • 1/2 cup creamy peanut butter
  • 1 (9-inch) baked pie crust (your favorite homemade or frozen crust blind baked,or a ready-made chocolate cookie crust)
  • 2 cups whipped cream or whipped topping of your choice

Instructions

  1. In medium sized bowl whisk together 1 cup milk, cornstarch, salt, and egg yolks. Set aside.
  2. In a medium sauce pan, add remaining 3 cups milk, butter and sugar. Whisk constantly over medium low heat until the mixture is scalding, not bubbling or boiling.
  3. Slowly whisk in milk/cornstarch/egg/salt mixture and cook over medium heat until thickened but do not boil.
  4. Remove the mixture from the heat, cover surface directly with plastic which will keep a skin from forming on the surface of the pudding mixture. Lift the plastic and stir every 5 - 10 minutes. The mixture will continue to thicken slightly more as it cools.
  5. While the pudding is cooling make the peanut butter nuggets as follows:
  6. In the bowl, add powdered sugar and peanut butter. Using an electric mixer, mix on medium speed until small peanut butter nuggets start to form. If the mixture is too dry to form little balls, simply add a few DROPS of water, mix again, and larger nuggets will form.
  7. After pudding is cool assemble the pie as follows:.
  8. Add half the peanut butter nuggets to the bottom of the pie shell. Top with all of the pudding. Add HALF the remaining peanut butter nuggets to the top of the pudding leaving remaining nuggets for garish on the cream topping.
  9. Top with whipped cream spreading evenly across the top up to the edges of the crust. Sprinkle whipped cream with the remaining peanut butter nuggets.
  10. Chill thoroughly to set before cutting. Store in refrigerator.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/10/02/pa-dutch-peanut-butter-nugget-pie/

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postheadericon Pa Dutch Wet Bottom Shoo Fly Pie

The Amish and Mennonites were and still are very frugal people; Shoo Fly Pie was created out of everyday food staples that were readily available. It is often eaten for breakfast along with a cup of coffee.  I feel it is a food group all its own! Shoo Fly Pie is available in two versions – dry bottom which is much more coffee cake-like, and wet-bottom, like this one, featuring a thick, luscious, sweet, molasses laden bottom layer topped with a layer of crunchy crumbs.

This recipe makes one 9 inch pie. The choice of which molasses to use is yours. If you like a very strong flavor of molasses, use the full cup of unsulphured baking molasses.  If you like the definite molasses flavor but want to tone it down a bit, mix half and half with corn syrup as this recipe calls for.  If you like your pie very sweet and mild, use all a full cup of table syrup. It is YOUR pie, so make it to YOUR taste! Addition of cinnamon and nutmeg to the crumbs is completely optional.  Sometimes I add them, sometimes I don’t – it depends on how the mood strikes me that day.  Again, make it to your taste! But, please… whatever you do — do make it!!  COOK’S NOTE: This unbaked pie is very jiggly and runny, so placing it on a baking sheet makes putting it in the oven much easier.

Pa Dutch Wet Bottom Shoo Fly Pie

Pa Dutch Wet Bottom Shoo Fly Pie

Ingredients

  • Pastry
  • 1 single pie crust pastry, rolled out and placed in 9" pie plate, crimp edges.
  • Liquid Filling
  • 1/2 cup molasses ( unsulphured Brer Rabbit, Grandma's, Golden Barrel Supreme, etc. but NOT blackstrap molasses)
  • 1/2 cup corn syrup
  • OR instead, use 1 cup table syrup (King's, Turkey brand, Golden Barrel Table, etc.) for a milder flavor
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp. baking soda
  • 3/4 cup boiling water
  • Crumbs:
  • 1- 1/2 cups flour
  • 3/4 cup dark brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup lard, shortening, or butter, soft (use lard for authentic Pa Dutch/Amish flavor)
  • OPTIONAL in crumbs
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp ground nutmeg

Instructions

  1. Filling:
  2. Beat the molasses and egg together, then beat in the baking soda. Slowly add boiling water and mix very well. Set aside.
  3. Crumbs:
  4. Mix flour and sugar, (and cinnamon and nutmeg if using) blend in the shortening (or lard or butter) with a pastry blender, or fingers until crumbs resemble pea-sized pieces. Gently pour molasses mixture into the pie shell. Sprinkle top evenly with the crumbs, getting an even layer across the surface and up to the edges of the crust.
  5. Bake at 350 degrees for 35-45 minutes. Pie will set as it cools.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/09/30/pa-dutch-wet-bottom-shoo-fly-pie/

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postheadericon Custard Pie

My Mom was a great pie maker.  She had a large repertoire of recipes, but one of my favorites was, and still is, a custard pie. Top of the list was peach custard made from sweet, local PA peaches, but the sweet cherry or blueberry was right up there, too.  You can easily turn this into a coconut custard pie by adding an inch of sweetened shredded coconut in the bottom and skip the fruit.  This very versatile basic custard is highly adaptable to your tastes. You can use your favorite pie crust or make things really simple and use a refrigerated or frozen crust.

COOK’S HINT: When ready to fill, place your pie pan with your crust and fruit onto a baking sheet. Place the sheet on the oven rack, pour in the custard, then bake. It is so much easier than trying to pick up just the pie pan filled with very runny filling and place it onto the oven rack.

Custard Pie

Custard Pie

Ingredients

  • 2 cups pitted, fresh or frozen fruit of your choice (diced peaches, bing or sour cherries, blueberries, mixed berries OR 1 inch layer sweetened shredded coconut))
  • 1 unbaked pie shell
  • 2 cups whole milk
  • 3 eggs
  • 2 T. all purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup white sugar
  • 1 tsp. vanilla

Instructions

  1. Drain if using frozen or canned fruit. Place in the bottom of the unbaked pie shell.
  2. Beat the eggs thoroughly in a mixing bowl, beat in the milk.
  3. Mix the flour and sugar together in a separate small bowl.
  4. Add the flour/sugar mixture to the milk/egg mixture and beat well. Stir in the vanilla.
  5. Pour the mixture into the unbaked pie shell over the coconut or fruit of your choice.
  6. Bake in a preheated oven at 400º for 35 to 40 minutes or until the custard is set in center. (A knife inserted in the center comes out clean.)
  7. May be eaten slightly warm or chilled.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/09/22/custard-pie/

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postheadericon Mock Apple Pie

Growing up as a kid of the 60s and 70s, seeing Mom make mock apple pie was always a little confusing but rewarding when that warm slice of pie hit the plate (and a forkful hit my tongue!).  A Depression Era staple, it was then popular among cooks as apples were often in short supply or un-affordable.  But making mock apple pies pre-dates the 1930s (into the 19th century – think Civil War…) and the recipes used saltines or soda crackers — it was even called cracker pie or soda cracker pie. Nabisco did not invent the recipe to sell their Ritz crackers. They did, however, start printing the recipe on the boxes during WWII.

So, it REALLY tastes like apples?  Some say resoundingly, “Yes!”. Some say, “Uh, nooo…” And some people like it very much and adore it for the memories it elicits of days in the kitchen with Mom or Grandma, smelling the pie baking and anticipating something made with love. It is tasty on its own and should be served warm. The sugary-lemony syrup poured over the crackers mimics the cooked fruit. Unsuspecting folks often chow down never suspecting the true origin of their “apple” pie.

No longer more economical than buying real apples, this pie is best served up for memories, good times, and a touch of nostalgia with the ones you love. This version is the original Ritz recipe and is for a double-crusted pie or the option for a crumb topping.

Depression Era Mock “Apple” Pie

Mock Apple Pie

Yield: 8

Ingredients

  • 2 cups sugar
  • 2 tsp. cream of tartar
  • 1-3/4 cups water
  • Zest and 2 Tbsp. juice from 1 lemon
  • Pie crust of your choice (enough for 1 double-crusted OR 1 for crumb topped)
  • 36 RITZ Crackers, coarsely broken (about 1-3/4 cups)
  • 2 Tbsp. butter or margarine, cut into small pieces
  • 1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon
  • Optional Crumb Topping
  • 25 ritz crackers, crushed
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter or margarine, cubed
  • whipped cream,or ice cream for garnich

Instructions

  1. Mix sugar and cream of tartar in medium saucepan. Gradually stir in water. Bring to boil on high heat; simmer on low heat 5 min. or until mixture is reduced to 1-1/2 cups. Stir in zest and juice; cool 30 min.
  2. Heat oven to 425°F. Roll out 1 crust on lightly floured surface to 11-inch circle; place in 9-inch pie plate. Place cracker crumbs in crust. Pour sugar syrup over crumbs; top with butter and cinnamon.
  3. Optional: Roll out remaining crust to 10-inch circle; place over pie. Seal and flute edge. Cut several slits in top crust to permit steam to escape OR: whisk together crumb ingredients until crumbly topping forms, then sprinkle over pie filling.
  4. Place pie in oven and bake for 15 minutes. Lower oven temperature to 350º F and bake for another 20 minutes or until golden brown. Cool slightly but serve warm.
  5. If pie top is browning too quickly, place a piece of aluminum foil lightly over the top surface to help prevent over-browning.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/09/18/mock-apple-pie/

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postheadericon Amish Funeral Pie

Funeral pie?!? The Pa Dutch love their pies, but gathering ’round the table is not always for joyous occasions. When a family in the Coal Region suffers the death of a loved one, friends and neighbors often send food to the family so that they can spend their time making final arrangements, comforting each other, and have nourishment to see them through some difficult times. My Mom often sent this pie, as many PA Dutch, Amish, and Mennonite cooks did, to a grieving family. It is believed that this pie was often chosen because the staples for it were almost always in the pantry and the pie keeps well.  It is a double-crusted raisin filling pie which is pretty sweet — it is thought this pie is deliberately made cloyingly, almost painfully, sweet to allow mourners to forget, if only for a moment, the pain of their grief.

Amish Funeral Pie

Amish Funeral Pie

Yield: 8

Ingredients

  • 2 c. raisins
  • 2 c. water
  • 1/2 c. brown sugar
  • 1/2 c. white sugar
  • 1 1/2 tsp. cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp. allspice
  • 1 pinch of salt
  • 3 Tbsp. cornstarch
  • 1 Tbsp. cider vinegar
  • 3 Tbsp. butter
  • pastry for 9-inch double crust pie

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400°. Line a pie pan with bottom crust.
  2. Place raisins and 2/3 cup water in saucepan; heat on medium for 5 minutes. Combine all sugars, starch and spices in a bowl and mix. Add them to raisin mixture and continue to cook until mixture bubbles.
  3. Add the vinegar and butter and cook until butter is melted. Cool until just warm.
  4. Pour mix into pie shell; cover with remaining shell. (or make lattice strips for top). Trim around edge of pan, crimp edges to seal. Cut 3 or 4 slits in top crust to allow steam to escape.
  5. Bake 25 minutes or until golden. Cool and serve.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/09/12/amish-funeral-pie/

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