Subscribe via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 203 other subscribers

Archive for the ‘Rolled & Cut Out Cookies’ Category

postheadericon Raisin Filled Cookies

Sometimes, there is a food we see, taste, or smell that evokes vivid memories of times past, and if we are lucky, of someone very special.  Raisin-filled cookies immediately bring to mind my Nana (my Mom’s mother) both because she absolutely loved these cookies and she made them all the time for us. My Nana had some real specialties in her repertoire; her chow chow, her fudge, her homemade bread, and these soft, luscious cookies with sweet cooked raisin filling sandwiched between two disks of sugar cookie dough baked to golden perfection. As a child, I always knew something special was coming out of the kitchen when Nana opened the closet door, took her over-the-head, full-bib, cotton print trimmed with ric-rac apron from the hook inside the door, pulled it over her head, patted down any loose bangs she might have displaced and started to gather ingredients needed for her current project. Now, in the 60s when I was a child, my Nana did what a lot of women in the Coal Region did – she worked Monday through Friday in a local garment factory. I remember her being dropped off by a co-worker after work (Nana never learned to drive), walking in the door wearing a cotton dress, penny loafers, and white ankle socks that were completely caked with gray and black fibers when she would take them off at night; a result of the garment factory conditions and fiber dusts the workers were exposed to. My Nana was a somewhat tall woman, opposite of my short, bow-legged Pappy (her husband), and she wore her very dark hair cut short in the back with pin curls in her bangs. She cut a commanding figure in the kitchen when she set about to create something and I can close my eyes and see every detail about Nana and the family kitchen yet today. And though it may not seem to some people that this woman who still lived in the home she was born into in 1901 and grew up in, married to a coal miner who was the love of her life for nearly 60 years, factory worker by day, would ever be described as “regal”, but that is exactly what she was to me. Regal. Gone from my life since 1975, I wish we had had more time together.  Miss you, Nana. Thanks for the memories (and the cookies!)

NOTES:

  • Use margarine as called for in this old recipe. Butter and margarine have different characteristics; butter will alter the spread and texture of these cookies.
  • There is no need to manually seal the two disks of dough over the filling. The soft dough will seal itself as it bakes and the process will allow steam to escape.
  • Do not over-fill the cookies. Make sure to keep clean edges around the sides of the disks of dough to aid in the cookies self-sealing when baking.

Raisin Filled Cookies

Yield: 2-1/2 dozen approximately depending on size

Raisin Filled Cookies

Raisin-filled Cookies

Ingredients

    Dough
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup margarine (no substitutes)
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 egg
  • 3 cups flour
  • 1/2 cup whole milk with 1 teaspoon white vinegar added, stirred and left to rest for 5 minutes
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp vanilla
    Filling
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 1/2 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 3/4 cup water
  • 1/2 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 8 oz of dark, seedless raisins (about 1-1/2 cups)

Instructions

    Dough
  1. In a stand mixer, or by hand cream the sugar and butter. Add the salt, egg, milk, baking powder, baking soda and vanilla; mix until combined.
  2. Turn off the mixer (if using) and add all 3 cups of flour. Turn mixer on low (or stir by hand) and mix until a soft, sticky dough ball is formed.
  3. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes or for several hours.
    Filling
  1. In a small saucepan, mix the sugar and cornstarch well to blend and smooth any lumps.
  2. Add water and whisk until smooth.
  3. Add the lemon juice and raisins and bring to a boil on medium heat.
  4. Reduce to simmer and cook for 5 minutes stirring constantly.
  5. Remove from heat and allow to cool completely. Filling will be thick.
    Assembly
  1. Divide dough into 3 parts, refrigerate remaining dough while working.
  2. Dust work surface with flour and roll out dough to 1/8 inch to just under 1/4 inch thickness.
  3. Cut into 2-1/2 to 3 inch rounds with cutter. Make sure to cut even numbers of rounds.
  4. Transfer to a parchment lined baking sheet.
  5. Top each bottom cookie round with a teaspoon or so filling. Do not allow filling to go all the way to the edge of the round and do not over-fill. Press the mound of filling down lightly with dampened finger if necessary to flatten somewhat.
  6. Top the cookie and filling with another cookie round. There is no need to seal the edges, the soft dough seals and bakes together.
  7. Bake 375 F for 10 to 12 minutes rotating the sheet pan half way through. Cookies should only start to be a bit golden brown on the bottom and should stay soft.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2019/01/07/raisin-filled-cookies/

Assembly of Cookies

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInDigg thisEmail this to someonePrint this page

postheadericon Moravian Black Walnut Cookies

This recipe is from an old family collection from my best friend who was born and raised in Bethlehem, Pa. before relocating to the Coal Region and Ashland, Pa. Bethlehem has a strong Moravian connection. Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, also known as Christmas City, USA,  was founded in 1741 when a religious group, members of the Moravian Church, purchased land where the Monocacy Creek flows into the Lehigh River. Bethlehem was christened as such on Christmas Eve, 1741 in a stable while the small group of Moravians were singing a hymn with the stanza “Not Jerusalem, Lowly Bethlehem”.  Black walnuts have a bold and distinctive flavor setting them apart from the more widely known English walnut. Nearly all Black Walnuts come from trees growing in the wild, while English walnuts come from orchards. Black walnuts are available in many major chain grocery stores, baking supply retailers, and are also available online from Hammond’s Black Walnuts. I adore the flavor of Black walnuts, but if you do not like them, English walnuts can be substituted but the cookies will not have the distinctive flavor that makes them special.

Moravian Black Walnut Cookies

Moravian Black Walnut Cookies

Ingredients

  • 1-1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup butter (1 stick), soft
  • Two whole eggs
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1 tablespoon baking soda dissolved in a teaspoon of white vinegar
  • 1/2 cup roughly chopped black walnuts (not English walnuts)
  • 3 cups flour

Instructions

  1. Cream butter and sugar until well blended.
  2. Add remaining ingredients, mix well.
  3. Roll into logs about 1-1/2 inches in diameter.
  4. Refrigerate until completely chilled (or freeze), then cut into 1/4 inch slices with sharp knife.
  5. Place on parchment lined cookie sheets.
  6. Bake 325F degrees for 8 to 10 minutes or until lightly browned around the edges.
  7. Cool on wire racks.
  8. OPTIONAL: Roll the logs in additional finely chopped black walnuts before wrapping and chilling.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/10/07/moravian-black-walnut-cookies/

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInDigg thisEmail this to someonePrint this page

postheadericon 5 ingredient Kolacky Cookies

Often found on cookie trays at the Holidays, these are so simple to make, you don’t have to wait for December to roll around. Recipe can be easily doubled (which I recommend, because these fly off the plate).

Kolacky Cookies

5 ingredient Kolacky Cookies

Ingredients

  • 3 oz cream cheese, softened
  • 1⁄2 cup butter, softened
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1⁄2 cup fruit jam or preserves, any flavor
  • 1⁄3 cup powdered sugar, for decoration

Instructions

  1. Beat together cream cheese and butter until smooth. Gradually add flour until well blended. Shape dough into a ball and chill for several hours or overnight.
  2. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (180 degrees C).
  3. Roll out dough to 1/8 inch thickness on a floured work surface (hint: use powdered sugar to avoid adding extra flour to the dough). Cut into 2 1/2 inch squares and place about 1/2 teaspoon of jam or preserves in the center of each square. Bring 2 opposite corners toward the middle so they slightly overlap and pinch them together to seal. Place cookies on ungreased baking sheets.
  4. Bake for 12 to 15 minutes or until lightly golden. Leave cookies on the baking sheets for about 2 minutes, then transfer to wire racks. Cool and lightly dust with powdered sugar.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/09/08/5-ingredient-kolacky-cookies/

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInDigg thisEmail this to someonePrint this page

postheadericon Polish Chrusciki

It is never too early to plan your holiday cookie making. These delicate Christmas cookies are also known as angel wings. Chrusciki are best served right away but can be stored at room temperature for several days. Store on a large platter, separating the layers with waxed paper, and cover them all with aluminum foil, not plastic.

Polish Chrusciki

Polish Chrusciki

Ingredients

  • 3 egg yolks
  • 2 Tablespoons sugar
  • pinch of salt
  • 2 Tablespoons sour cream
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1/2 teaspoon each lemon & orange zest
  • OR 1 tablespoon rum, brandy, or whiskey
  • 3/4 cup all purpose flour
  • up to 2 Tablespoons additional flour
  • 1 quart of oil for frying (safflower or canola)
  • 1/2 cup powdered sugar

Instructions

  1. In a small bowl using an electric hand mixer on high, beat egg yolks, sugar and salt until thick and lemon colored - about a minute.
  2. On low speed, stir in sour cream, vanilla, zests or liquor & flour. Stir in enough additional flour to form a mass (1-2 tablespoons)
  3. Transfer to a floured surface and knead 50 turns (about 2 minutes), adding extra flour as needed.
  4. Divide dough in half, keeping extra covered with plastic.
  5. On a floured surface, roll each section paper-thin to at least 12” across. Cut into 1 1/4-inch strips. Cut strips into 5-inch lengths. Make a slit in each strip. Pull one end through slit to make a bow tie.
  6. Deep fry in oil at about 350-365° F for about 30 seconds, turning once using 2 forks, until lightly golden on both sides. Do not crowd.
  7. Drain on paper towels. Let cool an sprinkle with powdered sugar.
  8. To re-crisp place on baking sheet in a 325° oven for about 5 minutes. Cool completely and re-dust with fresh powdered sugar.
  9. Note: can be mixed in a Stand Mixer and rolled using a pasta machine or attachment.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/09/08/polish-chrusciki/

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInDigg thisEmail this to someonePrint this page