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Archive for the ‘Sweets Things’ Category

postheadericon Pumpkin Cream Cheese Swirl Bars

I admit, I love pumpkin flavor – for me it’s a Dutchie thing.  I used to get so excited when fall rolled around and the stores started putting holiday baking supplies out on display — it was “that time of the year”!.  Then, “Pumpkin Overload” struck — foods of all kinds were being labeled “Pumpkin (something)” and seemed to be coming out of the woodwork and attacking unwary shoppers as we trudged down the aisles.  Not to be taken in by this alien invasion, I turned to my trusted Pa Dutch and Coal Region recipe arsenal and concentrated on my favorite pumpkin recipes — the rest can just go away as far as the Pumpkin Everything craze is concerned! In my young adulthood in the Coal Region, I had a wonderful neighbor who planted a garden and always gifted me with a long neck pumpkin which I would dutifully peel, cook, drain and mash in order to whip up some pumpkin baked goods magic, but I confess, today thanks to some physical limitations and, sadly, my generous neighbor passing away many years ago, my go-to now is a good old can of Libby’s pumpkin. Make sure to use the 100% pumpkin and NOT pumpkin pie filling which will alter this recipe and not turn out like you had hoped.  And, honestly, how could something not be a favorite of mine when cream cheese is swirled on top?? Budget friendly and travel friendly, these bars are great if you are called upon to bring a dessert to a family gathering or pot-luck.

Pumpkin Cream Cheese Swirl Bars

Pumpkin Cream Cheese Swirl Bars

Ingredients

  • 6 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 1 cup light brown sugar, packed
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 cup pumpkin puree
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
  • Swirl:
  • 4 ounces cream cheese, softened
  • 1 egg
  • 1/3 cup confectioners' sugar
  • 2 T all purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla

Instructions

  1. Heat oven to 350 F.
  2. Grease and flour an 11" x 7 " baking pan.
  3. In a large bowl with an electric mixer, beat butter with brown sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in 1 teaspoon vanilla and 2 eggs until light and creamy. Beat in pumpkin puree.
  4. In another bowl, combine thoroughly the 1 cup of flour with baking powder, soda, salt, and spices. Slowly beat into the first mixture until well blended. Spread in prepared baking pan.
  5. In a medium bowl, combine cream cheese, 1 egg, confectioners' sugar, 1/2 teaspoon vanilla and 2 tablespoons flour. Beat for 1 to 2 minutes, until smooth and creamy. Drop by spoonfuls on to the pumpkin batter. Using a small narrow spatula or butter knife, swirl the cream cheese batter into the pumpkin batter.
  6. Bake 30 to 35 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.
  7. Cool and cut into squares to serve.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/11/08/pumpkin-cream-cheese-swirl-bars/

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postheadericon Super Easy Crinkle Cookies

These cookies were in my cookie recipe collection for what feels like forever and they are one of my favorite – not only because I love the soft and chewy goodness of them, but because they are so ridiculously easy to make. When cookie craving time hits,  or I need a contribution for a cookie exchange or a quick dessert, this recipe is at the top of my list. My favorite is lemon, but you can change up the cake mix you use to make the cookies — try out chocolate or spice or pineapple — well, you get the idea. Just make sure you allow these to cool a minute or two before taking them from the baking sheet to place on a cooling rack. Because these are rolled in confectioners sugar prior to baking, I find lining my sheets with parchment paper is the way to go for ease of clean up. Make sure your cookie dough balls are nicely coated with the sugar before baking.

Super Easy Crinkle Cookies

Super Easy Crinkle Cookies

Super Easy Lemon Crinkle Cookies

Ingredients

  • 1 box lemon cake mix (I like Duncan Hines or Betty Crocker)
  • 1 beaten egg
  • 2 cups thawed Cool Whip
  • Approximately 1/2 cup to 1 cup confectioners sugar (powdered sugar)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 F
  2. In a large bowl, combine cake mix, beaten egg, and thawed Cool Whip.
  3. Mix well to form a sticky batter.
  4. Roll dough into tablespoonful sized pieces and roll in confectioners sugar.
  5. Bake 8 to 10 minutes until the edges are golden.
  6. Cool 1 - 2 minutes on baking sheet; then remove to wire rack to cool completely.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/11/06/super-easy-crinkle-cookies/

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postheadericon Italian Ricotta Pie

The Coal Region is a melting pot of ethnic influences; English, Welsh, Irish and German immigrants formed a large portion of the initial flow of immigrants after the American Civil War in the late 1800s followed by Polish, Slovak, Ruthenian, Ukrainian, Hungarian, Italian, Russian and Lithuanian immigrants. The influence of these immigrant populations is still strongly felt in the region, with various towns possessing pronounced ethnic characters and cuisine.  This recipe pays homage to those of us in the Coal region with Italian heritage. This is a very old recipe passed down through many generations. Like so many other dishes, every family has their own cherished version of this classic.  This recipe does not use butter in the crust but instead uses extra virgin olive oil which gives the crust a crispy, flaky, cookie-like texture on the outer edges and the bottom crust under the ricotta cheese filling is slightly cake-like in texture. Optional, but not included in the original recipe: add 1/4 cup mini chocolate chips or 1 tablespoon lemon zest to the filling before baking.

Italian Ricotta Pie

Italian Ricotta Pie

Ricotta Pie

Ingredients

    Crust
  • 1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 egg yolks (save egg whites for filling)
  • 1/3 cup whole milk
  • 1/3 cup good quality olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon almond extract
    Filling
  • 2 cups whole milk ricotta cheese
  • 1/2 granulated sugar
  • 3 whole eggs, beaten
  • 2 egg whites (saved from making the crust)
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
    Prep the oven
  1. Bring 2 or more quarts of water to boil on stove. In the bottom rack of the preheated oven, place a baking dish such as a 9×13-inch baking dish and fill with the hot, boiled water. Place another oven rack directly over that to next higher rack position.
    Make the pie dough
  1. In a large bowl, sift flour, baking powder and sugar. Stir to combine.
  2. In a smaller bowl combine egg yolks, milk, olive oil, and both extracts.
  3. Make a hole in the center of the flour and pour in liquid. With a wooden spoon, mix to combine. (If the mixture gets too difficult to combine with a wooden spoon, used your hands to finish mixing).
  4. Flour your countertop well and place the dough ball in the center, pressing to form a round disc. Flour a rolling pin and gently roll to a circle an inch or two larger than a deep dish 9-inch pie plate. (or roll between two pieces of parchment paper)
  5. Move the rolled dough to the pie plate. This dough is soft and delicate so be gentle.
  6. Use your fingers to form and press the dough into the the pie dish, crimping the top edge all the way around. If the dough tears, just patch it by pressing pieces together - no one will ever know! Set aside.
    Make the Filling
  1. Place the ricotta in a large bowl and mix in sugar until combined.
  2. Add whole eggs, egg whites and vanilla and stir to combine with a wooden spoon or wire whisk.
  3. Pour the filling directly into unbaked crust. Cover the crust edge with foil or pie crust shield so the edges don’t get too browned as the pie bakes.
  4. Place pie in the center of oven on the rack set over the water bath and bake for one hour and ten minutes. Turn off oven but leave the pie in the oven for ten more minutes. (Don’t open the oven door during any of the time that the pie is in the oven.)
  5. Remove the pie from the oven and place on a wire rack to cool completely before refrigerating – if you put the pie in the refrigerator while still warm, it will weep slightly and collect moisture on top.)
  6. Chill overnight uncovered. Cut and serve.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/10/31/italian-ricotta-pie/

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postheadericon Classic 7up Cake

In the Coal Region, we have churches and bars in almost every town –  no matter how small the town — sometimes on every corner. In the little village where I grew up – population less than 300 people — we had two churches and several bars (the number of bars at any given time depended on the decade; some closed when owners aged, retired or passed away). In addition to the bar at the Hosie (the fire company) during the years of my youth, there were a couple of bars in town my Pappy (grandfather) frequented on a some-what regular basis – much to the chagrin of my Nana (grandmother). He was a retired bootleg miner, succumbing to the ravages of Black Lung, and in my ten-year old eyes, he could do no wrong. I often rode my bike “uptown” to go meet up with Pappy at the bar when it was time for supper and he often brought home a 6 pack of Coke in those little green bottles from the bar for me.  My hero!  It is funny, I remember no details about the bar other than there was one of those soda machines outside the door that dispensed bottled soda – the kind where you inserted the money, opened a long glass door, and pulled a bottle out of the dispenser. When it came time to make this cake, my Mom always sent me uptown on my bike to buy a bottle of 7up from that machine.  I will always believe that soda tasted so much better from those bottles back then. This recipe was in my Mom’s handwriting, has been in my collection for decades and I can close my eyes and be 10 years old again, climbing on my bike to go make the soda run for her to make my favorite cake.  Lemony and delicious, my Mom’s recipe called for cake flour which I believe gives it a nice texture and crumb. If you do not have cake flour, you can create your own cake flour: take 1 cup of all purpose flour, remove 2 Tablespoons of it, add 2 tablespoons corn starch, sift it five or six times and you have created your own cake flour.  Have your eggs and butter at room temperature before starting. NOTE: the oven is set at a low temperature for this cake.

Classic 7up Cake

Classic 7up Cake

Classic 7up Cake

Ingredients

  • 1-1/2 cups unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 3 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 5 large eggs
  • 3 cups cake flour
  • 1/2 cup room temperature lemon lime (original) 7 Up
  • 1 tablespoon lemon extract
  • OPTIONAL
  • 7 up Glaze (see below)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 315 F.
  2. Prepare a large Bundt or tube pan with nonstick baking spray, or grease well and flour.
  3. In a large mixing bowl, using an electric mixer, beat the butter for two minutes on high speed until pale in color.
  4. Add in sugar and salt and cream together for an additional seven minutes, scraping down the sides of the bowl a couple times until very pale yellow and fluffy.
  5. Add in the eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition.
  6. Slowly add in flour with the mixer at lowest speed. Do not over beat at this point. Pour in 7 Up and extract and mix just until thoroughly combined. (do not over beat)
  7. Pour batter into prepared pan and bake for 75-85 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean.
  8. Allow the cake to cool in pan for 10 minutes, then invert onto plate. Cool completely.
    7up Glaze
  1. In small bowl, mix 1 cup of powdered sugar with 2 tablespoons of 7- up until smooth. Drizzle over completely cooled cake.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/10/30/classic-7up-cake/

Soda vending machine of my youth.

 

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postheadericon Welsh Cakes or Bakestones

Welsh Cakes originate from the country of Wales in Great Britain — an ancient Celtic country, historically known for agriculture and mining. It was once, and for a long time, the largest coal producing nation on earth.  Originating in the 1800s, these cakes were often carried into the mines both in Wales and by Welsh immigrant miners here in the Anthracite Coal Region as a meal. Since they are durable, filling and delicious, Welsh Cakes became a favored treat of the coal miner husbands of many a Welsh housewife.  My Mom’s father’s family had Welsh roots and immigrated to the New World where their connection to the Anthracite Region and coal mining encompassed several generations.Welsh Cakes are also known as “Bakestones” because they are traditionally made on a cast iron griddle known as a bakestone. The cakes are a cross between a cookie, a scone, and a pancake but they are truly unlike any of these things when it comes to taste and texture. They are made from ingredients similar to a scone, but they are cooked like a pancake on a griddle or in a heavy pan — they are NOT BAKED. Sweet, but not too sweet, they can be eaten out of hand, can be served plain, sprinkled with super-fine or confectioners sugar, with cinnamon-sugar, or spread with butter or jam. In addition, they’re excellent the next day, warmed in the toaster.  Welsh Cakes are often made with lard but you have options — use all butter, use some butter and some lard (as here in my Mom’s recipe) or use all lard. Some recipes use spices, this one does not (but you might choose to use them); I suspect cooks in 1800s Wales did not have exotic spices like nutmeg at their fingertips and the addition of spices were added later.  You can skip the currants if absolutely necessary — like if eating them causes you imminent danger — but I highly suggest you add them, they make a world of difference. If you cannot, or do  not want to use currants, golden raisins may be substituted.  Leftover cakes can be split and warmed in the toaster or frozen for eating later.

 

Welsh Cakes

Welsh Cakes

Welsh Cakes or Bakestones

Ingredients

  • 2 cups all purpose flour
  • 2/3 cup cold butter AND
  • 1/3 cup lard
  • OR use 1 cup all butter or 1 cup all lard
  • 2/3 cup superfine sugar
  • 1/2 cup currants (or golden raisins)
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • OPTIONAL 1/2 tsp ground nutmeg or 1/2 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • Pinch salt
  • Milk, if needed

Instructions

  1. Sift the flour, baking powder, spice (if using) together into a mixing bowl.
  2. Cut up the cold butter and lard and rub into the flour mix with fingers until it is crumbs.
  3. Stir in the sugar and currants, pour in the egg and mix to form a dough, use a little milk if the mixture is a little dry.
  4. Roll the dough out on a lightly floured surface to about 1/4 inch thickness.
  5. Use a 3 inch round pastry cutter to cut out rounds.
  6. Cook the cakes on a lightly greased cast iron pan/griddle or heavy frying pan until golden. (Heat should not be too high, as the cakes will cook on the outside too quickly and not in the middle.
  7. Once cooked sprinkle with super fine sugar, cinnamon sugar or split and eat with butter or jam.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/10/29/welsh-cakes-or-bakestones/

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postheadericon Homemade Peanut Brittle

When I was a child in the 60s and early 70s, we visited my Mom’s sister, my Aunt Gerry. often. She lived in Jersey just across the river from Philly (Philadelphia). Our drive included traveling Route 61 through the tiny borough of Port Clinton (Pa.), an old canal and railroad town near the intersection of Pa. Route 61 and Interstate 78 in Schuylkill County. On the main street — busy Rt. 61 — is the Port Clinton Peanut Shop.  If you blink while driving by, you will miss it. But it is a fixture in the town and has been for many decades. Still in business today, they have old-fashioned/nostalgic candy, fudge, and they still roast peanuts fresh on the premises. But it was the peanut brittle I remember most and the treat that peaked my child’s imagination as I spotted the Pagoda in Reading (Pa.) on the mountainside headed home on Route 61 and KNEW it would not be long before we were able to stop at the Peanut Shop.  Now, let me tell you, Rt. 61 is busy.  I mean REALLY busy. The kind of busy where multiple lanes of traffic zip by so fast a parked car rocks in their wake.  My poor Dad (actually, my super brave, best in the world, no one like MY Dad) would pull in to a hard-to-come by parking spot on the northbound side of Rt. 61, get out the car, and take his life in his hands – literally – to sprint across the highway and into the Peanut Shop. He would return, repeating his death-defying feat, arms loaded with bags of freshly roasted peanuts in the shell and — peanut brittle! Every time I page through my recipe file and see this recipe, I am 10 years old again, sitting in the back seat of the family’s blue Buick Electra, nose pressed up against the side rear window, waiting for him to emerge from the Port Clinton Peanut Shop with those treasures.  I miss you so much, Pop. And it is only now, later in my life, that I realize just how truly enjoyable life was when you still were in it. NOTE: use care when working with hot sugar syrup mixtures – they can stick to your skin if contact is made and cause deep burns.

Homemade Peanut Brittle

Homemade Peanut Brittle

Homemade Peanut Brittle

Ingredients

    Have all your ingredients ready and prep your pan before starting the cooking process!
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1 cup corn syrup
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 2 tablespoons butter + more for pan if using
  • 1 tablespoon baking soda
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 cups dry roasted or raw peanuts

Instructions

  1. Prepare and gather all ingredients and prepare a large low-sided baking sheet by lining with parchment paper, a silicone mat, or lightly buttering surface.
  2. Place sugar, corn syrup, water, and 2 Tablespoon butter in a medium-size heavy saucepan. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until mixture starts to boil. Boil without stirring until a candy thermometer reaches 240.
  3. Add peanuts, and cook 2 to 3 more minutes or until temp hits 285 to 290F. (The cooked mixture should be golden brown.) Watch temperature carefully, it can go beyond this quickly and ruin your batch.
  4. Remove from heat, and stir in baking soda, salt and vanilla extract. Be careful, mixture can bubble up when making these additions and it is VERY HOT!!
  5. Pour mixture onto a prepared metal shallow pan. Quickly spread the brittle by tilting the pan and allowing the mixture to flow across the pan to all edges forming a thin layer.
  6. Allow to stand several minutes or until cooled and hardened. Break into pieces.
  7. Optional: Drizzle with melted chocolate chips.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/10/27/homemade-peanut-brittle/

Port Clinton Peanut Shop

Reading Pagoda at night overlooking the city.

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postheadericon Woolworth’s Lemon Icebox Cheesecake

As a small child in the 1960s, living in a very small town in the Coal Region (in Schuylkill County), it was a big adventure to “go over to Pottsville” (Pa.) with my Mom for a day of shopping and lunch in what was then a typical, small city bustling downtown. We made our way from Sears across the street to Pomeroy’s, then up and down Centre Street. We would walk and window shop and just enjoy time together.  And, oh, what a  marvelous day it was when the trip included a stop at the S & H Green Stamp store to turn in a fistful of filled books for… ANYTHING!! When lunch time rolled around, I absolutely loved stopping by one of the several eateries in Pottsville (I adored club sandwiches at The Sugar Bowl on Market St.) and I delighted in sitting on a stool and swiveling (in only the way kids can do) at “the lunch counter” found in stores like H.L. Greens and Woolworth’s. Now, I don’t remember a lot about Woolworth’s in Pottsville EXCEPT I remember me sitting with my Mom at that lunch counter. The memories are vivid and oh, how I miss those days and how I miss my Mom.  If you have eaten at a Woolworth’s lunch counter, you may have had this dessert (aka Woolworth’s Lemon Icebox Cheesecake). This recipe is great for a pot-luck or gathering. It is light, and luscious, and totally  addicting. Make sure to use full fat evaporated milk (NOT sweetened condensed milk) when making this.

Woolworth's Lemon Icebox Cheesecake

Woolworth's Lemon Icebox Cheesecake

Woolworth's Lemon Cheesecake

Ingredients

  • 1 - 12 ounce can Carnation evaporated milk, well chilled
  • 3 cups graham cracker crumbs
  • 3/4 cup confectioners sugar
  • 8 tablespoons butter, melted (1 stick)
  • 1 - 3 ounce box lemon Jell-O gelatin
  • 1 cup boiling water
  • 1 - 8 ounce package cream cheese, room temperature
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 4 tablespoons fresh lemon juice OR 2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Instructions

  1. Several hours before prep, shake the can of evaporated milk and refrigerate until well chilled.
  2. In a small mixing bowl, dissolve the Jell-O completely in the boiling water. Set aside to cool to lukewarm.
  3. In another bowl, combine graham cracker crumbs, confectioners sugar, and melted butter. Reserve 1/3 cup of the mixture for the topping. Press the remainder firmly into the bottom of a 13 x 9 inch dish. Refrigerate or put in the freezer until needed.
  4. In another large mixing bowl and using an electric mixer, beat together the cream cheese, granulated sugar, lemon juice (or vanilla) until smooth and creamy. Beat in the cooled Jell-O until well blended. Refrigerate mixture for now.
  5. Shake the can of chilled evaporated milk again and pour into another large mixing bowl. Beat on high speed of mixer until light and fluffy, 3 to 4 minutes. It should have the consistency of beaten egg whites. Beat in the cream cheese/Jell-O mixture.
  6. Pour mixture over the chilled crust. Sprinkle top with the remaining crumb mixture. Refrigerate for several hours before cutting into squares.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/10/26/woolworths-lemon-cheesecake/

Downtown Pottsville, Pa. and Woolworth’s

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postheadericon Old Fashioned Popcorn Balls

With Halloween almost here and little ghouls and gobblins ready to descent on us for goodies, I got thinking back to my childhood when we “went Halloweening” in the Coal Region (many of us in Schuylkill County didn’t call it going “trick or treating”. We also worked for our treats — performing a song, dancing a little jig, reciting a poem or a joke — there was no “grab and go” collecting of treats when I was a kid!!)). It was inevitable someone passed out something other than chocolate — or that really cheap, junky candy mix stuff– and I always hoped for a popcorn ball.  I just loved them. Crunchy, and sweet, and salty, and usually wrapped in waxed paper, they were best eaten the night received and I made sure mine never saw the light of the net day! I think this little blast from my past is going to be on my to-do list this weekend.

Old Fashioned Popcorn Balls

Old Fashioned Popcorn Balls

Old-fashioned Popcorn Balls

Ingredients

  • 2 cups granulated sugar
  • 1-1/2 cups water
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 cup light corn syrup
  • 1 tsp white vinegar
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 20 cups good quality popped corn

Instructions

  1. Spread popcorn on a baking sheet, and place in preheated 200F oven to keep warm.
  2. Butter sides of saucepan. In it combine sugar, water, corn syrup, salt and vinegar.
  3. Bring to boil and cook to 250F (hard ball stage).
  4. Remove from heat and stir in vanilla carefully. (This mixture is extremely hot and will burn you easily - use care when handling).
  5. Place the warm popcorn in a large bowl and pour the syrup slowly over the popcorn, stirring and tossing just to coat well. Allow to cool slightly for safe handling.
  6. Butter hands lightly an shape into desired sized popcorn balls. Work quickly at this point!
  7. Wrap in plastic wrap or in decorative bags with ribbon when completely cooled.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/10/25/old-fashioned-popcorn-balls/

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postheadericon Classic Snickerdoodles

My favorite snickerdoodle recipe uses BOTH butter (for flavor) and shortening (for texture). You can substitute all one for the other, but you will not get the same flavor and texture results as you get with this recipe. Snickerdoodles were popular in the 1900’s on the Easy Coast and continue to be very popular, including in  the Pennsylvania Dutch and Coal Regions. There are lots of theories about the true name and origin of this widely-loved cookie, but seems to largely be credited to the German word schneckennudeln, which loosely translated means cinnamon-dusted sweet rolls. Wherever they originated, they have always been a favorite of mine and remain in a cherished spot on my “must have” cookie list.

Classic Snickerdoodles

Classic Snickerdoodles

Snickerdoodles

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup softened butter
  • 1/2 cup shortening
  • 1 - 1/2 cups white sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 Tbsp vanilla
  • 2 - 3/4 cups all purpose flour + 2 Tbsp
  • 2 tsp cream of tartar
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • Cinnamon Sugar (in small bowl mix 3 Tbsp white sugar + 2 tsp ground cinnamon together well)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 375 F.
  2. Cream together butter, shortening, 1-1/2 cups sugar until well blended. Add eggs and the vanilla and blend well.
  3. Stir in the flour, cream of tartar, soda and salt until well blended.
  4. Using a spoon or small cookie scoop, form dough into balls.
  5. Roll balls of dough in cinnamon/sugar mixture until completely coated on all sides.
  6. Place the cookies 2 inches apart on parchment lined baking sheets.
  7. Bake 8 to 10 minutes or until just lightly browned on the edges.
  8. Allow to cool on baking sheet 2 or 3 minutes before removing to a rack to cool completely.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/10/20/classic-snickerdoodles/

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postheadericon Amish Baked Pineapple Casserole

There are several versions of baked pineapple casseroles. I chose to share this one because it was passed along in a bunch of Mennonite church supper recipes I have had in my collection for years. The Southern (US South) version of Baked Pineapple Casserole adds cheese and uses crackers. Yet another version does not include bread at all.  Because this version has sentimental connections for me, I usually choose to make this one. This dish is a great accompaniment to the Easter ham and it shows up consistently at Mennonite and Amish church and social gatherings. I have never seen any leftovers when it is on the menu! If you really want to gussy it up, add drained pineapple rings to the top and insert a maraschino cherry into the middle of the ring. This is yummy enough to use as a dessert, too. Scoop out or cut into squares to serve.

Baked Pineapple Casserole

 

Amish Baked Pineapple Casserole

Ingredients

  • 1⁄2 cup butter
  • 1⁄2 cup white sugar
  • 4 eggs, well beaten
  • 1 (20 ounce) can crushed canned pineapple in its own juice, drained
  • 6 slices white bread, cubed into 1/2 inch cubes (challah bread works well, too)
  • OPTIONAL
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • pinch of ground nutmeg

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 F degrees.
  2. Butter a 1-1/2 or 2 quart casserole dish.
  3. Cream butter and sugar until well blended.
  4. Add eggs; beat until combined.
  5. Stir in drained crushed pineapple and bread cubes. (add cinnamon and nutmeg if using)
  6. Pour into prepared dish.
  7. Bake for 50 to 55 minutes or until evenly browned on top
  8. You can lightly sprinkle the top at this point with granulated sugar then place under the broiler, watching carefully, until top caramelizes and is brown.
  9. Delicious served warm or cold.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/10/17/amish-baked-pineapple-casserole/

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