Newest Recipes
Subscribe via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 88 other subscribers

Archive for the ‘Recipes’ Category

postheadericon Pickled Pig’s Feet

I have had several requests for “Pickled Pig’s Feet” which is actually different than the Souse recipe  on this site, even though some people refer to Souse as “pickled pig’s feet”. This is an old recipe and I make no guarantee to it’s success – it is not something in my regular repertoire. Pickled Pig’s Feet are available commercially prepared with Hormel being a recognized brand, but many Coal Region and Pa Dutch country folks have access to great markets and butchers who can supply fresh pigs’ feet and prefer to make their own. This recipe is from Oxmoor House Homestyle Recipes

Pickled Pig’s Feet

Pickled Pig’s Feet

Pickled Pigs' Feet

Ingredients

  • 4 pig's feet, cleaned and scraped
  • 1 small onion, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 cup chopped celery
  • 2 bay leaves (1 leaf used in 2 different places)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 cup cider vinegar
  • 12 whole cloves

Instructions

  1. Place pig's feet in a large container with cold water to cover. Soak 3 hours; scrub with a stiff brush. Rinse thoroughly.
  2. Combine pig's feet, onion, celery, 1 bay leaf, salt, and pepper in a large Dutch oven with cold water to cover. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer 3 hours or until meat is tender and separates from bones.
  3. Remove feet from cooking liquid with a slotted spoon. Place in a plastic, glass, or stainless steel container with a tight-fitting lid; set aside.
  4. Strain cooking liquid through a sieve; discard vegetables and bay leaf. Set cooking liquid aside to allow fat to rise to surface. Remove fat, and discard. Set cooking liquid aside.
  5. Combine vinegar, cloves, and remaining bay leaf in a saucepan. Bring to a boil; reduce heat, and simmer 1 minute. Add reserved cooking liquid, and bring to a boil.
  6. Pour vinegar mixture over pig's feet to completely cover. (Additional water may be added to cover pig's feet, if necessary. ) Set aside to cool to room temperature. Cover and refrigerate 24 hours.
  7. Remove pig's feet from vinegar mixture; serve cold.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/12/10/pickled-pigs-feet/

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInDigg thisEmail this to someonePrint this page

postheadericon Souse

Souse is a variety of head cheese found in Pennsylvania Dutch cuisine. Head cheese is not a dairy product but rather a product made from (tah dah…) the head of an animal (usually pig or calf) along with some other left-over “scraps” that remain after butchering and often include the feet, tongue, and heart.  In a frugal household or in peasant cultures, no part of an animal that can be used is left go to waste. Pa Dutch and Coal Region favorites such as scrapple make use of “everything but the oink”.  Head cheese itself, however, is not specific to the Pa Dutch culture, but rather can be found in various cuisines across the US and globe including Caribbean and Eastern European.

The word SOUSE itself probably comes from the Germanic souce, or pickling juice, which is related to sulza, or brine. Think of souse as head cheese with vinegar added.  The traditional way to make head cheese is to simmer an animal’s head, which is very bone dense, for several hours which will then yield the bounty of rich gelatin needed to produce headcheese/souse. This gelatinous broth binds the meat together to form a terrine-like product usually in the shape of a loaf.  These days, if you find yourself without the source of a pig’s head because, well, say you gave up butchering your own animals when you took that IT job and moved to the heart of San Francisco, there’s good news. You can use some other parts to make this version of souse; pigs’ feet! In fact, some people refer to this dish as “pickled pigs’ feet”. A good butcher shop – or if you are blessed to live in Pa Dutch country, the area farmers’ markets – will often provide you with a source for the un-smoked pig’s feet. Some grocery stores with their own butcher on staff may also be able to get them for you. This may not be a recipe you can make from items you normally find at the corner store in many places, but this page is dedicated to presenting authentic recipes for the foods we know and eat in the Coal Region and in Pa Dutch households, so I present it to you from my Coalcracker Kitchen. (Many deli meat producers in the Pa region make Souse or Head Cheese commercially and you can try it that way from the supermarket deli. Distribution may vary widely, so calling your local market first is always a good idea.) Head cheese and souse are typically served cold or at room temperature. If in loaf form, they are sliced and served, as with cold cuts, on a sandwich or as an appetizer along with cheese and crackers. NOTE: This recipe is taken directly as published in “200 Healthy Amish Food Recipes” by Lev Well

 

Souse or Pickled Pig's Feet

Souse or Pickled Pig's Feet

Pa Dutch Souse

Ingredients

  • 4 pigs' feet
  • 1 cup chopped pickles
  • 2 cups vinegar
  • 2 cups stock
  • 2 Tablespoons salt
  • 1 Tablespoon whole cloves
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 Tablespoon broken cinnamon stick

Instructions

  1. Scrape and clean feet well and put on to boil in enough salt water to cover. Simmer for approximately four hours or until meat separates from the bones.
  2. Mix stock in which meat was cooked with vinegar, salt, pepper, and spices. Bring to the boiling point and hold for 30 minutes.
  3. Strain liquid to remove spices.
  4. Place pieces of meat and chopped pickle in a flat dish or stone jar and pour the sour liquid over it. (Coalcracker kitchen note: A loaf pan works well, too.)
  5. Chill in refrigerator until perfectly cold.
  6. Slice and serve.

Notes

From a Coalcracker in the Kitchen: You can also form this by pouring it into a loaf pan. Excess fat can be skimmed off the top surface once completely cold. You can also add one or two mild red cherry peppers, de-seeded and cut up along with the pickles (often found in the pickle section of your grocery store).

http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/12/09/souse/

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInDigg thisEmail this to someonePrint this page

postheadericon Lithuanian Bacon Buns

The Southern Coal region of Pennsylvania is known as “Little Lithuania”.  Anthracite and the industry surrounding it lured many Lithuanians in during the 1860s-1910s era.  Shenandoah (Pa), earned itself the nickname, “the Vilnius of North America” and was a much larger town then than it is today, with a population of upwards of 40 000, a quarter of them Lithuanians.  Lithuanian migration to the Coal Region was often a result of Lithuanians back home being discriminated against under the Russian Imperial rule with their language banned between years 1865 and 1904.  The locations with the most Lithuanian heritage in Schuylkill County are Shenandoah itself, Shenandoah Heights, Frackville, Mahanoy City, Mount Carmel, and Tamaqua.  Almost every town here has (or had) a Lithuanian church, cemetery, and club(s).  Is it any wonder that Lithuanian foods are such a part of our Coal Region heritage and holiday celebrations?  A Christmas time treat in many homes in the Coal Region is lasineciai – Lithuanian Bacon Buns. These special bites of heaven are passed  around during Christmas in Lithuanian homes. accompanied with the salutation, “Linksmu Kaledu,” which means Merry Christmas!

NOTES:

  • Semi-frozen bacon is much easier to cut into pieces.
  • Use a nice, meaty bacon like you find at a good farmers’ market or butcher shop.
  • You can make these with frozen, thawed bread dough from the grocery store, but they will not be the same taste and texture as the scratch made dough – which is rich and a little sweet like a brioche dough – but it does cut down dramatically on prep-time.
  • As you make successive batches and get more proficient, you may find you prefer to pinch off individual balls of dough and flatten, fill, and shape them using that method rather than a cutter.

Lithuanian Bacon Buns

Lithuanian Bacon Buns

Lithuanian Bacon Buns

Ingredients

    Filling
  • 3/4 pound good bacon, cut into 1/4 inch pieces
  • 1 medium onion, finely chopped
    Dough
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 1/4 pound unsalted butter
  • 1/4 cup white sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 package active dry yeast or 2 1/4 teaspoons from a jar of yeast
  • 3 large room temperature eggs, beaten
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
    Egg Wash
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 2 teaspoons water

Instructions

    Filling
  1. Put bacon and onion in frying pan, add water to barely cover. With lid on, simmer until water evaporates watching closely.
  2. Place filling in refrigerator to cool completely.
    Dough
  1. Scald milk. Whisk in butter, sugar, and salt. Cool to lukewarm (110 - 115 F degrees).
  2. Whisk in the yeast.
  3. Place this mixture in the bowl of a stand mixer or other large bowl.
  4. Add the beaten eggs and flour and beat vigorously with wooden spoon or mixer's paddle attachment until smooth.
  5. Lightly grease top of dough, cover bowl with towel and let rise until doubled in warm spot.
  6. Punch down dough and let rise until doubled one more time.
  7. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface. Cut in half and work with one half of dough at a time, keeping other half covered.
  8. Roll dough about 1/4 to 3/8 inch thick. Cut out 3 inch circles of dough with a round cutter.
  9. Place a tablespoon or so of cooled bacon mixture in center of circle.
  10. Fold over and pinch edges of dough together to completely cover the filling.
  11. Shape into a ball or torpedo shape and place seam side down on parchment lined baking sheet leaving space between buns to rise and expand. Repeat with other half of dough; re-roll scraps.
  12. Cover rolls lightly with greased plastic wrap and let rise until almost doubled.
  13. Pre-heat oven to 375 F. Brush rolls with egg wash.
  14. Bake 20 to 25 minutes until golden brown. Brush with butter when removed from oven if desired.
  15. Can be served hot, at room temperature or reheated in the oven.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/11/29/lithuanian-bacon-buns/

 

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInDigg thisEmail this to someonePrint this page

postheadericon Schnitz un Knepp

Schnitz und Knepp is quintessential Pennsylvania Dutch; an old recipe, the name translates to “Apples and Buttons”.  The dish consists of schnitz (dried apples), ham, and knepp (the dumplings or “buttons”). It gets its “sweet/sour” flavor from the tart apples and the brown sugar in the broth. Not difficult to prepare, it does take some time due to the cooking of the ham piece and the soaking of the dried apples, but both those steps can occur mostly simultaneously.  Cool weather season is a great time to make this dish, but it is certainly enjoyable year round!  If you do not want to make dumplings from scratch, you could use a baking mix and make the dumplings using the recipe on the box. I encourage you to make the scratch version though. In some areas of Pa Dutch country, you will find schnitz un knepp on the menu at restaurants and diners. It is often served accompanied by a salad of greens with Hot Bacon Dressing.

Some things to keep in mind:

  • This dish can also be made with ham hocks, or even some slices of smoked ham.
  • Make sure to use TART apple schnitz in this dish. Commercially available schnitz comes in two versions — tart or sweet.
  • Schnitz can often be found in Amish and Pa Dutch area markets in bags, ready to soak.
  • Schnitz can be purchased online, but can be expensive that way.
  • You can make your own! Dried tart apples can be made in a food dehydrator or in your home oven if you have a dehydrating setting..

Schnitz und Knepp

Schnitz und Knepp

Schnitz un Knepp

Ingredients

  • 1 lb. dried apples
  • 2 to 4 tablespoons brown sugar (depending on your personal taste)
  • 1 chopped medium onion
  • 3 lbs. end piece smoked ham
    KNEPP:
  • 2 c. sifted flour
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 3 tbsp. melted shortening
  • 4 tsp. baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp. pepper
  • 2/3 c. milk

Instructions

  1. Place dried apples in a bowl and cover with enough water to cover. Set aside and soak for 3 hours.
  2. Place ham piece in large pot that has a tight-fitting lid. Add enough water to just cover meat and simmer 1-1/2 to 2 hours covered.
  3. When ham is tender, remove from pot, pull ham from the bone, and cut into cubes, return to pot and add the onion and dried apples along with the water in which the apples were soaked.
  4. Add the brown sugar and simmer for 30 to 40 minutes OR until apples are tender.
  5. When apples are tender, make the knepp.
    KNEPP (Buttons = dumplings)
  1. In a bowl, stir together flour, baking powder, salt, and pepper.
  2. In another bowl, mix egg and milk well, then add to dry ingredients.
  3. Drizzle in the melted shortening and mix just enough to dampen dry ingredients.
  4. With the ham broth in the pot boiling, drop the dumpling batter (knepp) from a table spoon on to the boiling broth.
  5. Cover tightly, reduce heat but keep the broth bubbling lightly and cook 18 to 20 minutes without lifting lid.
  6. Serve hot with broth.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/11/26/schnitz-un-knepp/

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInDigg thisEmail this to someonePrint this page

postheadericon Pa Dutch Braised Red Cabbage

I have a very special fondness for the traditional German and Pa Dutch “sweet/sour” flavor. And since cabbage is one of my favorite vegetables, I am always looking for ways to serve it to keeps things exciting!. This dish features the very traditional “Dutchie” sweet/sour flavor and uses red cabbage (and BACON!!). I love this braised cabbage alongside roasted pork loin, roast beef, or even turkey, but my absolute favorite way to enjoy this is alongside a lovely piece (or two) of pan-fried fresh (or smoked) sausage made by one of the many local meat shops or butchers still plentiful in the Coal Region;  the sausages nestled next to a mound of fluffy mashed potatoes or browned butter egg noodles.  Budget friendly, left-over friendly, and very easy to prepare, I encourage you to give it a try. (And if you can, get some true, country style bacon from one of the great butchers, shops, or farmers’ markets in the Coal Region or Pa Dutch country, too!)

Pa Dutch Braised Red Cabbage

Pa Dutch Braised Red Cabbage

German Braised Red Cabbage

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup cider vinegar
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1/4 cup packed brown sugar
  • 10 cups red cabbage, shredded
  • 2 bacon strips, diced
  • 1 medium tart apple, peeled and chopped
  • 1/2 cup chopped onion
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves

Instructions

  1. In a large bowl, stir the cider vinegar and sugars until sugars are dissolved. Add cabbage; toss to coat. Set aside for 10 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, in a large frying pan or dutch oven with lid, cook bacon over medium heat until crisp. Remove bacon to paper towels to drain.
  3. In the drippings left in the pan, saute apple and onion until tender, 5 to 10 minutes.
  4. Stir in water and cabbage mixture. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer for 35 to 40 minutes.
  5. Stir in the remaining ingredients. Simmer, uncovered, several more minutes or until cabbage is tender. Sprinkle with reserved bacon before serving.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/11/21/pa-dutch-braised-red-cabbage/

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInDigg thisEmail this to someonePrint this page

postheadericon Pa Dutch Hot Slaw

Many people are familiar with Cole Slaw – shredded cabbage topped with a dressing served cold as a side dish.  It is one of those dishes where every cook has “their” recipe and it seems everyone makes it a little differently than everyone else. There is never a holiday dinner in my house that does not include my version of cole slaw, passed down from my Mom. My husband loves it and I also make it a lot throughout the year. It is not unusual to find cole slaw in my fridge as the result of having left over cabbage from something else I cooked that week. My frugal side will not allow me to waste perfectly good food, so I am pretty good at finding ways to use up odds and ends. I am a huge fan of cooked cabbage dishes; it is the Dutchie and Coal Cracker upbringing, I suppose. So, imagine the thrill I find in a dish that combines cooked cabbage with the sweet/sour flavors of my version of cole slaw!  Let me introduce you to Pa Dutch Hot Slaw.  Not “hot” from spicy peppers, but “hot” as in temperature. Well, it is actually more of a “warm” slaw, but that’s beside the point. This is a great side dish for colder, winter months and graces a holiday table nicely.  If you are looking for a side to add to your holiday dinners, why not give this a try!

Pa Dutch Hot Slaw

Pa Dutch Hot Slaw

Hot Slaw

Ingredients

    Slaw
  • 6 cups finely shredded green cabbage
    Dressing
  • 1 tbsp. butter
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1/4 c. vinegar
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1 1/2 tbsp. sugar
  • 1/8 tsp. paprika
  • 1/4 c. water
  • 1/4 c. light cream

Instructions

  1. Finely shred cabbage.
  2. Cook cabbage in a small amount of lightly salted water until tender making sure not to allow the pan to cook dry.
  3. Drain well. Keep warm.
  4. Toss warm cooked cabbage with warm cooked dressing.
    Dressing
  1. Melt butter in top of double boiler.
  2. In bowl, beat eggs, vinegar, salt, sugar, paprika and water together.
  3. Whisk into the melted butter and cook over the simmering water until the dressing thickens, whisking frequently.
  4. Remove from heat and whisk in cream.
  5. Beat with electric mixer or hand beater water until fluffy.
  6. Pour over the warm cabbage and toss to mix thoroughly..
  7. Serve.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/11/19/pa-dutch-hot-slaw/

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInDigg thisEmail this to someonePrint this page

postheadericon Bum Stew or Bum Soup

The Coal Region has seen its share of hard times. As Anthracite coal and the accompanying industry saw a significant decline by the 1920s and mines and breakers closed, other industries came in to take its place. Manufacturing jobs were available as well as a large amount of garment factory work among other things. But even then, most families had to be very frugal – many had a lot of mouths to feed, or jobs did not pay well.  Like much of the country, the Coal Region felt the effects of The Great Depression, rationing during WWII, and the attempt to return to “normal” at the end of the war.  A way to save money was to be creative with inexpensive ingredients that made a large volume of food to feed the family, and the shopper in the household carefully planned each and every meal, menu, and trip to the grocery store. The most popular meals or dishes usually consisted of items already in the pantry, easily available, and affordable. Enter “Bum Stew” or “Bum Soup”. Once again, every cook had “their” version, but basically it consisted of ground beef, potatoes, and green beans simmered in water to create a filling soup. This version in my files also uses condensed tomato soup, a relatively inexpensive pantry item even “back in the day”. It does add a richness to the stock that is otherwise absent, but when times were tough, even a can of tomato soup took money out of the family budget therefore many people only remember bum stew made with water.  You can also use some canned beef stock in place of water if you choose.  Many folks who remember growing up eating “bum stew” still crave it today, even if they can afford more expensive meals.  Good memories have no price tags! As with most soups and stews, the flavors develop if made one day, refrigerated, then reheated to serve the next day.

 

Bum Stew or Bum Soup

Bum Stew or Bum Soup

Bum Stew (or Bum Soup)

Ingredients

  • Bum Stew:
  • 1 pound ground beef
  • 1 - 10.75 ounce can condensed tomato soup
  • 5 cups water
  • 1 large onion, chopped small
  • 4 carrots, peeled and small dice
  • 3 potatoes, peeled and cut into small cubes
  • 1 lb. fresh green beans, cleaned and cut into bite sized pieces
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Brown the ground beef in a large pot.
  2. Drain off half of the fat.
  3. To the pot and beef, add the onions, carrots, and potatoes,. Toss and cook the vegetables to get some color on them.
  4. Add the tomato soup, water, and green beans to the pot with the beef.
  5. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
  6. Bring to boil then reduce heat to simmer. Simmer, covered, for 30 - 40 minutes or until the vegetables are tender.
  7. Serve.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/11/15/bum-stew-or-bum-soup/

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInDigg thisEmail this to someonePrint this page

postheadericon Pa Dutch Hog Maw

Hog Maw = Stuffed Pig’s Stomach. Now, before you run the other way, think about eating sausage stuffed in “natural” casing. You do realize “natural casing” are animal intestines, right? Okay, now for those of you still with me… It is said the Pa Dutch use everything except the “oink” from a hog. When your life calls for frugality, you learn to waste nothing – scrapple is a perfect example. Stuffed pig’s stomach is not confined to Pa Dutch cuisine however; it is found in Chinese, Soul Food, and Latin American cuisine to name just a few. Hog Maw is traditionally stuffed with cubed potatoes, sausage, onions and seasoning. Some cooks also add cabbage to their stuffing.  The mixture is “stuffed” into the cleaned stomach, the ends are sewn shut, and the Hog Maw is baked until it is browned and crispy then sliced for serving (for those who enjoy the taste and texture of the actual stomach) or the stuffing scooped out (for those who like the stuffing, but not the actual stomach). The choice is totally up to the person about to partake!  Hog Maw remains a traditional holiday dish among the Pa Dutch, especially being served on New Year’s Day along with the traditional pork and sauerkraut as a way of ensuring good luck for the coming year. Leftovers can also be served cold as a sandwich. Traditionally served in the winter, Hog Maw was made around the time of hog butchering days on the farms of Lancaster and Berks Counties and elsewhere in the Pennsylvania Dutch Country.  The original recipe was most likely brought to Pennsylvania from Germany where it is called “Saumagen” and served on a bed of sauerkraut., The stuffing is as individual as the person cooking the Hog Maw.  There is great debate as to whether adding cabbage is “correct” or not.  Since you are the one eating it, my philosophy is that you should be the one deciding what your Hog Maw stuffing should contain! This old recipe calls for both loose fresh sausage and cut-up smoked sausage. In the Coal Region and Pa Dutch areas of Pa., it is not hard to locate delicious fresh and smoked sausage made by local butchers and meat packers that put that commercially prepared “famous name” stuff to absolute shame.  Your stuffing is only as good as the ingredients, so find the best and use them! The stomach will stretch as stuffed.

NOTE: In Pennsylvania, the pig’s stomach can usually be purchased at one of the many traditional butchers at local farmers’ markets or local butcher shops. Some will clean/prep the stomach for you. If you do the prep yourself, wash the hog maw inside and out in cold water. Use a knife to scrape away excess fat or trim fat with kitchen shears. Rub and continuously rinse the hog maw until cleaned (some people use coarse salt to help with the rubbing and cleaning). There are Youtube videos to help you through this step.

-

Pa Dutch Hog Maw

Pa Dutch Hog Maw

Pa Dutch Hog Maw

Ingredients

  • 1 large pig's stomach, well cleaned (all fat removed)
  • 1 pound fresh loose sausage or link sausage, casing removed and crumbled OR 1 pound sweet Italian if fresh is not available
  • 1 pound smoked sausage cut into 1/2-inch slices
  • about 2 - 2 & 1/2 pounds Russet potatoes, washed, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch cubes
  • 2 medium yellow onions, coarsely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped
  • OPTIONAL: 2 cups shredded cabbage
  • Salt and pepper to taste (amount varies depending on the seasoning already in your sausage)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350° F.
  2. Mix together the crumbled fresh and sliced smoked sausages, cubed potatoes, chopped onions (and shredded cabbage if using), parsley, and salt and pepper to taste.
  3. Sew the small opened end of the stomach with cooking twine to close.
  4. Stuff sausage mixture into stomach, pressing well with each addition.
  5. Once stuffed, sew closed the remaining open end with cooking twine.
  6. Place stuffed stomach in a shallow roasting pan. Pour a little water into the pan.
  7. Roast uncovered until potatoes (and cabbage if using) are tender and stomach is crispy, about 2 hours or so, basting about every 20 minutes with water or pan juices. If browning too quickly, cover with a tent of aluminum foil.
  8. Remove stomach from roasting pan. Slice stomach into 1 inch thick slices or scoop filling out.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/11/14/pa-dutch-hog-maw/

 

 

 

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInDigg thisEmail this to someonePrint this page

postheadericon Creamed Chipped Beef (SOS)

Creamed chipped beef, affectionately known as Sh*t on a Shingle (I’d spell it out, but this is an all ages welcome page…) is a staple in many areas of Pennsylvania. (In many Mennonite households, it is known as “Dried Beef Gravy”)  It is often found in diners as a regular menu item both in Pa Dutch country, the coal region, and in Philly.. And my Dad LOVED it!  I grew up on it.  Mom used to make it all the time but she used chipped dried beef, freshly sliced from the deli department of the local grocery store. In Schuylkill County, it was easy to find this way. Today, the dried beef is available many places in pouches in the pre-packaged deli meat section of stores. If you can get it freshly chipped in your deli section, I highly suggest using that version! My Dad was a WWII veteran, having served in Italy.  The military apparently loved making and serving SOS — it was no-muss, no-fuss food that fit in with often restrictive circumstances that needed to be overcome to feed a bunch of hungry soldiers or an entire outpost.  Much maligned by many, both during their service and after discharge, my Dad often asked for it as not only breakfast but as any meal of the day. He often joked that he was one of the few guys excited to find that SOS was on the menu for the day. Many versions of this recipe call for  making the white sauce first then adding the beef to it.  My version, which goes back to how my mom made it, calls for lightly frying the chipped beef, then making the white sauce in the pan with the meat. I always felt the dish developed more flavor this way.  And so, in honor of Veterans’ Day 2018 (thank you to ALL who served), the 100th anniversary of the Armistice that ended WWI, and my Pop – recipient of the Bronze Star in WWII for heroic achievement in action with the medical detachment of the 85th “Custer” Infantry Division on the Fifth Army front in Italy — I present to you Dad’s favorite!  (Oh, how I miss you, Dad.  Every day.)

Creamed Chipped Beef (S.O.S.)

Yield: 6

Creamed Chipped Beef (S.O.S.)

Creamed Chipped Beef (SOS)

Ingredients

  • 1/4 pound dried chipped beef
  • 4 Tablespoons butter
  • 4 Tablespoons all purpose flour
  • 2-1/2 cups whole milk
  • Black pepper to taste
  • OPTIONAL dash of hot sauce

Instructions

  1. Shred the beef into bite-sized pieces if needed.
  2. In heavy fry pan, melt the butter.
  3. Add the beef and fry a couple minutes until the edges begin to curl and the beef brown slightly.
  4. Sprinkle flour over the beef, stir amd cook a minute or two stirring constantly.
  5. Slowly add the milk while whisking and cook slowly until thickened.
  6. Adjust pepper to taste (salt may not be necessary due to the salt content in the beef).
  7. Serve over toast triangles (or toasted English muffins, biscuits, etc.)
  8. May be reheated by adding a dash of milk to bring back to consistency.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/11/12/creamed-chipped-beef-sos/

My Dad, Steps of the Vatican, circa 1944

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInDigg thisEmail this to someonePrint this page

postheadericon Pumpkin Cream Cheese Swirl Bars

I admit, I love pumpkin flavor – for me it’s a Dutchie thing.  I used to get so excited when fall rolled around and the stores started putting holiday baking supplies out on display — it was “that time of the year”!.  Then, “Pumpkin Overload” struck — foods of all kinds were being labeled “Pumpkin (something)” and seemed to be coming out of the woodwork and attacking unwary shoppers as we trudged down the aisles.  Not to be taken in by this alien invasion, I turned to my trusted Pa Dutch and Coal Region recipe arsenal and concentrated on my favorite pumpkin recipes — the rest can just go away as far as the Pumpkin Everything craze is concerned! In my young adulthood in the Coal Region, I had a wonderful neighbor who planted a garden and always gifted me with a long neck pumpkin which I would dutifully peel, cook, drain and mash in order to whip up some pumpkin baked goods magic, but I confess, today thanks to some physical limitations and, sadly, my generous neighbor passing away many years ago, my go-to now is a good old can of Libby’s pumpkin. Make sure to use the 100% pumpkin and NOT pumpkin pie filling which will alter this recipe and not turn out like you had hoped.  And, honestly, how could something not be a favorite of mine when cream cheese is swirled on top?? Budget friendly and travel friendly, these bars are great if you are called upon to bring a dessert to a family gathering or pot-luck.

Pumpkin Cream Cheese Swirl Bars

Pumpkin Cream Cheese Swirl Bars

Ingredients

  • 6 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 1 cup light brown sugar, packed
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 cup pumpkin puree
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
  • Swirl:
  • 4 ounces cream cheese, softened
  • 1 egg
  • 1/3 cup confectioners' sugar
  • 2 T all purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla

Instructions

  1. Heat oven to 350 F.
  2. Grease and flour an 11" x 7 " baking pan.
  3. In a large bowl with an electric mixer, beat butter with brown sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in 1 teaspoon vanilla and 2 eggs until light and creamy. Beat in pumpkin puree.
  4. In another bowl, combine thoroughly the 1 cup of flour with baking powder, soda, salt, and spices. Slowly beat into the first mixture until well blended. Spread in prepared baking pan.
  5. In a medium bowl, combine cream cheese, 1 egg, confectioners' sugar, 1/2 teaspoon vanilla and 2 tablespoons flour. Beat for 1 to 2 minutes, until smooth and creamy. Drop by spoonfuls on to the pumpkin batter. Using a small narrow spatula or butter knife, swirl the cream cheese batter into the pumpkin batter.
  6. Bake 30 to 35 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.
  7. Cool and cut into squares to serve.
http://www.acoalcrackerinthekitchen.com/2018/11/08/pumpkin-cream-cheese-swirl-bars/

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInDigg thisEmail this to someonePrint this page